Music

Overview | Requirements | Courses | Faculty

Overview

The Occidental Music Department is a community that values and cultivates the creation, performance, and critical study of the world's musics. Students majoring in music develop an integrated understanding of music as creative work, as cultural and historical expression, and as performance. Through its curriculum, recitals, lectures, master classes, residencies, and other public events, the Music department leads the musical discourse that enriches College and community life.

Music majors and minors develop their craft in a rigorous analytical study of music from the world's musical traditions, which they apply to their own artistic expression as they engage in specific studies in composition, performance, conducting, music theory, and music history. In addition to upper-division courses requiring a reading knowledge of standard music notation, the Music department also offers a wide array of special topics courses in subjects ranging from popular music and jazz to opera, choral music and art song, instrumental music, music for film, and music in world cultures. Classroom and private studies are coordinated with opportunities to attend live concerts by the world-class musical artists who perform on campus and elsewhere in the Los Angeles area. Students study, practice, and perform in Booth Music Hall and Thorne Hall, with ready access to practice rooms, large and small performance halls, an electronic music studio, and a music library of scores, recordings, and computers with musicianship and notation programs.

The music major is designed to enable students to enter into music-related professions. Alumni have become successful in opera, musical theater, professional choruses and orchestras, in careers as concert artists, and as composers and arrangers for films, television, and theater. Many have become music teachers in private studios or at the elementary, middle and high school, or college and university level. Still others have become involved in related professions such as arts management, sound engineering, music editing, and publishing. Because of the quality, breadth and depth of Occidental College's liberal arts curriculum, alumni who majored in music are prepared to enter graduate school with a wide variety of professional goals.

The music curriculum is structured so that students who are undecided about majoring in music may begin their music studies in their second year at Occidental and complete the major by the end of their fourth year. However, the development of musical craft and artistry requires time as well as effort, and students considering a major or minor in music are urged to begin taking music theory courses and applied music studies in their first year at the college. Students who plan to study abroad in their third year at the college must begin their music theory studies in their first year.

Requirements

MAJOR: Music Theory: 3 courses, 12 units (Music 151/151A, 250/250A, 251/251A). Music History and Culture: 4 courses, 16 units (Music 261, 263, one 200- or 300-level non-Western or popular music course (280, 285 or 385), and one additional course numbered 200 or higher, chosen in consultation with your music advisor). Junior and Senior Seminars: 2 courses, 6 units (Music 390, 490). Electives: 2 courses numbered 200 or higher, 8 units chosen in consultation with your music advisor. Applied Study: 2 units (MUSA 100-105 and Music 139, MUSA 201-206). Ensemble: 2 units (Music 120-129).

The following course clusters are intended as guides for students interested in pursuing an emphasis in performance or in composition in their last two years at the College. Students interested in music history, ethnomusicology, theory and analysis, or critical studies in music and culture will consult with their departmental advisor to craft and execute an appropriate plan of study.

Students interested in vocal performance:
Private applied study each semester in residence
Ensemble participation each semester in residence
Two years of French, Spanish, or German
MUSC 115 (Topics in Opera)
MUSC 257 (Composition I)
MUSC 260 (Western Music and Culture: Chant to 1600)
MUSC 262 (Western Music and Culture: 1789-1914)
MUSC 285, 385 (Topics in the Critical Study of Music)

Students interested in instrumental performance:
Private applied study each semester in residence
Ensemble participation each semester in residence
MUSC 257 (Composition I)
MUSC 262 (Western Music and Culture: 1789-1914)
MUSC 272 and/or 273 (Instrumental Conducting, Choral Conducting)
MUSC 285, 385 (Topics in the Critical Study of Music)

Students interested in composition:
Private applied study each semester in residence
Ensemble participation each semester in residence
MUSC 257, MUSC 357 (Composition I and II)
MUSC 130, 230 (Electronic Music, Advanced Electronic Music)
MUSC 262 (Western Music and Culture: 1789-1914)
MUSC 272 and/or 273 (Instrumental Conducting, Choral Conducting)
MUSC 285, 385 (Topics in the Critical Study of Music)

COMPREHENSIVE REQUIREMENT: Senior music majors complete a senior project related to the student's area of interest. All senior projects involve both a written and an oral component. Each component is graded High Pass (HP), Pass (P), or Fail (F). A final grade of Pass with Distinction (PD) on the senior comprehensive will be awarded if all components (written, aural, and performance, if applicable) are graded High Pass.

In the Fall semester of their junior year, students submit a proposal for their senior project to the Music Department faculty for approval. Students with a particular interest in music history, ethnomusicology, theory and analysis, or critical studies in music and culture will propose a senior thesis of 25 or more pages in length. Students with a particular interest in composition will prepare a portfolio of original compositions, including both acoustic and electro-acoustic music, some of which will be presented in a composition recital during the senior year. Composers will write an accompanying paper of 10 pages or more in length, describing their compositional processes and influences. Students with a demonstrated ability in performance or conducting will propose a junior and a senior recital, and will write an accompanying paper of 10 pages or more in length which addresses analytical and historical issues related to music on the senior recital. Students with other specific musical interests will complete a project designed with their advisor.

All seniors will present their work in a public forum during the spring semester.

MINOR:

Emphasis in Performance: 20 units, including MUSC 151 and 250, one course from MUSC 261 or 262, and four semesters each of applied music study and ensemble participation.

Emphasis in Ethnomusicology: 20 units, including Music 150, one course from Music 102-105 and 111, one 200- or 300-level non-Western or popular music course (280, 285 or 385), and two additional courses at or above the 200-level agreed upon with your Music advisor. These two courses must be related to ethnomusicological approaches and methodologies – courses in sociology, cognitive science, psychology, and linguistics, for example, may be appropriate.

Emphasis in Music History: 20 units, including Music 151 and 250; 261; then either two from 260, 262, 263, OR one from 260, 262, 263 and one music-history elective 200-level or above, agreed upon with your Music advisor.

Emphasis in Music Theory: 20 units, including Music 151, 250, 251; 261; one 200+ elective from Composition, Conducting, Topics in Advanced Analysis, or other course agreed upon with your advisor.

Emphasis in Composition and Media: 20 units, including Music 151 and 250, 257, 130 and 230, one semester of applied music study or ensemble participation, and one additional course at or above the 200-level agreed upon with your Music advisor. This course may be taken outside the Music Department: Sound Design for Theater, Film, and Multimedia (THEA 248), or Sound Theory and Design (ARTM 240), for example. MUSC 117 would also be a good choice for an additional course.

WRITING REQUIREMENT: Students majoring in Music will satisfy the final component of Occidental College's college-wide writing requirement by successfully completing MUSC 390 in the junior year with a grade of B- or better and receiving a notation of "Satisfactory" for its writing component. Students not achieving a "satisfactory" notation by either of these means will be required to undertake additional coursework in academic writing during the final two semesters of study. While the content of MUSC 390 will change from year to year, it will always include a significant writing component. Students should familiarize themselves with the departmental requirement at the time of declaring the major. See the Writing Program for additional information.

HONORS: Students who have achieved at least a 3.25 average in their music courses and have demonstrated exceptional potential in performance, composition, music history or theory may apply for the Honors Program at the beginning of their junior year. For information about the Honors Program, students should consult with their Music Department faculty advisor. See the Honors Program for additional information.

AWARDS: The Elinor Remick Warren Award is presented for the most outstanding student composition. The Peters Prize is awarded to the student who has done the most to promote music on the Occidental campus. The James F. English and Marie E. English Award is given to the most promising vocal student, and is used for one year of private vocal study at Occidental College. The Marcia Hannah Farmer Award is given to a vocal student and is applied toward private vocal study at Occidental College.

MUSIC THEORY PLACEMENT: A Music Theory placement examination is given during Orientation each Fall. All Music students will begin their Music Theory study in one of three ways: by taking MUSC 101 (no prior experience with music fundamentals), MUSC 150/150A (some experience with music fundamentals, and intent to continue with the Music Theory sequence), or MUSC 151/151A (an AP Music Theory score of 4 or 5 or significant prior work in Music Theory).

Courses

Music Courses

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101 - Materials of Music

An introductory course in the techniques of music for the student who has little or no previous musical training. Topics will include notation, modes, intervals, melody, harmony, rhythm, and structural elements of music.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

102 - Music of Latin America

This course will examine the diverse forms and social contexts of Latin American and Caribbean music, while exploring the ways that musical performance has been used to negotiate power relations in the social, political, and economic spheres since the Conquest. Focusing on musical genres and movements from Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, Mexico, Peru, and Trinidad, students will learn to recognize the techniques and instruments used in a wide array of traditional and contemporary styles, particularly those which have grown out of the hybridization of African, Middle Eastern, European, Asian, and Native American performance strategies. While knowledge of music theory and performance skills are not necessary, it is essential that students be prepared for intensive music listening in and out of class.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: LATIN AMERICA • FINE ARTS and REGIONAL FOCUS

103 - Music of Asia and the Pacific Islands

This course surveys the musical styles and genres of Asia from India through the southeastern part of the continent and includes the countries and islands of the Pacific. Within an ethno-historical framework established at the beginning of the course, emphasis is placed on 1) the region's important musical genres, their social function and musical characteristics, and 2) the instruments used in performing these musical genres. Where appropriate, distinctions will be made between classical and folk genres. While knowledge of music theory and performance skills are not necessary, it is essential that students be prepared for intensive music listening in and out of class.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: CENTRAL/SOUTH/EAST ASIA  FINE ARTS and REGIONAL FOCUS

104 - Music of Africa and the Middle East

This course surveys the musical styles and genres of the African continent and the Middle Eastern world. Within an ethno-historical framework established at the beginning of the course, emphasis is placed on 1) the region's important musical genres, their social function and musical characteristics, and 2) the instruments used in performing these musical genres. While knowledge of music theory and performance skills are not necessary, it is essential that students be prepared for intensive music listening in and out of class.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: AFRICA AND THE MIDDLE EAST • FINE ARTS and REGIONAL FOCUS

105 - African American Musics

This course surveys music of African Americans, with an emphasis on 20th century classical and vernacular genres. We will examine this musical web in three units: Classical, Jazz & Blues, and Rock & Contemporary Vernaculars. Featured artists include William Grant Still, Marian Anderson, Margaret Bonds, Duke Ellington, Fats Waller, Big Mama Thornton, Sam Cooke, The Five Blind Boys of Alabama, Motown, Stax Records, and Atlantic Records, Jimi Hendrix, Sweet Honey in the Rock, and Mos Def. Through extensive listening, reading, and group dialogue, this class will explore how the paradigms of African American cultural experience are deeply interwoven within the musical narratives of the U.S. and its cultural satellites. No prior musical training is necessary.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: DIVERSITY IN THE U.S. and FINE ARTS

111 - Topics in Jazz History

A nontechnical survey of jazz from its origins to the present, with special emphasis on informed listening. Extensive listening assignments will supplement readings.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES • FINE ARTS and US DIVERSITY

112 - Topics in Popular Music: Digital Music-Cultures

Pop music blogs, online social networks, home recording studios, and mashup/remix communities are emerging musical spaces in the digital era. In this course we will study music-cultures that are enabled and generated by digital media and technology. We ask how digital media shape the mode of production, transmission, and reception of contemporary popular music. Using principles of ethnomusicology, we will examine how music as a "digital vernacular" creates a sense of place and self in the increasingly globalized world; how social, media, and technological institutions organize 21-century music participation at the grassroots, independent level. A laptop computer is required.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS ● INTERCULTURAL

115 - Topics in Opera

Since its beginnings in late 16th-century Florence, opera has occupied the most diverse of minds: whether lovers of authority (from Louis XIV to Rudy Giuliani) or lovers of the folk (from Jean-Jacques Rousseau to Rufus Wainwright); whether masters of horror (from Edgar Allen Poe to William Friedkin) or masters of the humane (from Søren Kierkegaard to Toni Morrison); whether purveyors of the scholarly (from Friedrich Nietzsche to Kwame Anthony Appiah) or purveyors of the popular (from Scott Joplin and George Gershwin to Beyoncé Knowles and Woody Allen). In this historical survey course, we will examine this diversity of responses to and in opera by studying 1) the precise musical forms and styles of the most famous operas, and 2) the primary source documents written as responses to individual operas and opera writ large. We will thus study individual operas in their political, philosophical, and cultural contexts. Required listening and reading will be supplemented by required trips to the Los Angeles Opera, for rehearsals of operas by Mozart, Verdi, and Puccini. No prior musical experience is required.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS ● INTERCULTURAL

117 - Topics in Music for Film and other Media

This course will survey film music from its silent film era origins to the present, focusing on its many functions through in-class viewing, analysis, and critique of film clips. The works of many prominent film composers as well as some lesserknown figures will be examined in terms of style and approach, as well as their own views on the film-scoring process. Fundamental information on music, film, and psychology of music will be introduced, and the role of music in other media (such as TV and experimental video) will be explored.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL • FINE ARTS

119 - Why Music Matters

This course provides a general introduction to the elements and history of Western music over the last three centuries. Students will focus on learning how to listen to music, with an emphasis of identifying musical forms, genres, and styles. This focus will serve the larger goal of the course, which is to show how understanding music can not only lead to our greater enjoyment of it but also help us to better understand history and culture. Students with no musical experience are especially welcome.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

128 - Chamber Jazz & Improvisation

This course will serve as an intensive laboratory component to the Occidental jazz program by having students learn the fundamentals of jazz theory, including the following: extensions of common practice tonality; modes; form; notational practice and reading from charts; basic arranging and instrumentation; and transcription. Weekly written theory and listening assignments will be supplemented by performance assignments. In class, students as well as instructor will critique one another's performances.  Prerequisite:  Music 150 or permission of instructor.

150 - Introduction to Music Theory

Designed for students with some beginning experience in music theory and an ability to read music. Covers scales, keys, modes, intervals, and basic tonal harmony. Prerequisite: MUSC 101, or a passing grade on the Music Theory placement examination, or an AP Music Theory score of 3 or higher, or permission of instructor. Requires concurrent enrollment in MUSC 150A.

151 - Theory and Practice of Music I

This course presents the basic principles of musical form and analysis, including modal counterpoint and harmonic practice through tonicization. Students will engage in analytic and compositional projects in consultation with Music History faculty. Prerequisite: Music 150/150A, or AP Music Theory score of 4 or higher. Requires concurrent enrollment in Music 151A.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

197 - Independent Study in Music

Prerequisite: Permission of department.
2 units

215 - Making Opera in Los Angeles

The history of opera is a history of the continuous reinvention of a genre in order it to accommodate the time, place, and tastes of its audiences; as such, opera provides a lens for studying cultural, intellectual, political, and economic history. With now even non-operatic companies, like the Los Angeles Philharmonic, staging operas in Disney Hall, opera has, in the past three decades especially, become a terrific lens for studying Los Angeles.T his course will study opera as delimited by its production and reception in Los Angeles over the past century. We will research what operas were first produced in Los Angeles, where, and for what audiences, and how the production and reception of opera, and later zarzuela, evolved over the course of the twentieth century and into the new millennium, as Hollywood directors such as Woody Allen and William Friedkin have turned to directing opera. Students will attend operas principally at LA Opera, our community partner, but also at Long Beach Opera, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and other SoCal venue.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: GLOBAL CONNECTIONS and FINE ARTS

230 - Topics in Electronic Music

Topics include the continued study of theoretical, historical and aesthetic principles underlying computer/electronic music, leveraging the study of software applications (Logic, MaxMSP, Digital Performer, ProTools, Cloud Generator, MetaSynth) towards the creation of electronic, electro-acoustic, and/or interactive, multimedia composition. The class may include an emphasis on collaborative multimedia artwork such as film, theater, dance, and multimedia installations, covering the conceptual and practical aspects of creating and producing electro-acoustic music within that framework. Prerequisite: Music 130 or permission of instructor.
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

250 - Theory and Practice of Music II

This course deepens students' exposure to techniques for analysis and composition in the style of 18th-19th century common practice. We will study imitative genres and sectional forms (ternary, sonata, rondo), exploring chromatic extensions of diatonic practice. Students will engage in analytic and compositional projects in consultation with Music History faculty. Prerequisite: Music 151/151A. Requires concurrent enrollment in Music 250A.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

251 - Theory and Practice of Music III

Students will explore extensions of chromatic harmonic practice through the turn of the 20th century, and will be introduced to the musical language of iconic 20th-century composers (Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Debussy, Bartok). Students will engage in analytic and compositional projects in consultation with Music History faculty. Prerequisite: Music 250 or permission of instructor. Requires concurrent enrollment in Music 250A.

257 - Composition and Orchestration I

Writing exercises to develop technical facility; study of characteristics of instruments; exercises in scoring for various vocal and instrumental combinations. This course may be repeated three times for credit. Prerequisite: Music 151 or permission of the instructor. 

261 - Western Music and Culture: 1600-1789

This course surveys the two centuries that gave rise to European art music's most enduring legacies: opera, instrumental art music, and, especially, the major-minor tonal system, which, as the system that informs most music today, is arguably Europe's greatest-ever cultural export. The emergence of this tonal system will enable instrumental music to sustain a listener's attention through dramatic forms and without the aid of words; comprehending how these forms behave will be one of our central tasks. In turn, the cultivation of instrumental genres will fuel the operatic accomplishments of Classical composers, notably Mozart. Our study of vocal and instrumental music will proceed chronologically and focus on individual cities, starting with Florence and ending with Vienna. With the only prerequisite in taking this course being the ability to read musical notation, students from other disciplines who are eager for music-intensive study are especially welcome. Music majors and minors taking the course will be given assignments tailored to their knowledge and departmental expectations. Freshmen may not enroll in this course. Prerequisite: sophomore Status
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: PRE-1800 ● EUROPE and REGIONAL FOCUS

262 - Western Music & Culture in the 19th Century

This interdisciplinary course will survey the music of the long 19th century, from the French Revolution to the beginning of World War I. We will commence by considering Beethoven's response to Napoleon, the Eroica Symphony, in the context of post-Revolution European geo-politics, and end with the musical cultures of turn-of-the-century Vienna, Paris, and New York City. Topics to be explored include the following: the Industrial Revolution and emergent technologies (including photography); landscape painting and poetry; nationalism (including "folk" music); aesthetics and philosophy; science and medicine; the expansion of tonal and formal musical language, and the essaying of new musical forms; the public concert, and music for home performance; and Richard Wagner and artistic responses to his music and writings. No prerequisites.
CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: FINE ARTS • EUROPE

263 - Western Music & Culture in the 20th Century

This course surveys Western musical practice of the 20th century, commencing with the wide-ranging artistic responses to the music and writings of Richard Wagner, in Europe and in the United States, and the emergence of a "musical modernism," as new forms and new pitch systems take hold. We will then follow the radical experimentation of the 1920s ultra-modernists through to the post-minimalist eclecticism of John Adams and Kaija Saariaho at the century's end, throughout alert to the political, philosophical, and cultural forces shaping the music at issue. With the only prerequisite in taking this course being the ability to read musical notation, students from other disciplines who are eager for music-intensive study are especially welcome. Music majors and minors taking the course will be given assignments tailored to their knowledge and departmental expectations.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS ● INTERCULTURAL and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

272 - Instrumental Conducting

Basic principles and gestures of instrumental conducting in a variety of genres: symphony, concerto, opera. We will also discuss the "business" of conducting and running rehearsals. Prerequisite: MUSC 151

273 - Choral Conducting

Introduction to conducting technique from a choral/vocal perspective. Students will learn to develop musical interpretation through score study, analysis, and clear gestural vocabulary. Prerequisite: Ability to read music; choral experience preferred. 

280 - Introduction to Ethnomusicology

Offers an introduction to the principal concepts and methodologies of the field of ethnomusicology as well as the style and practices of selected world musical traditions. Prerequisites: Music 101 or permission of instructor.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL • FINE ARTS

285 - The Music Video

Since its emergence in the late 1970s, the music video has become the dominant means of advertising popular music and musicians, as well as one of the most influential multimedia genres in history.  Music videos have affected aesthetic style in a wide range of film and television genres, introducing experimental and avant-garde techniques to a mass audience.  Because most music videos last only a few minutes, it is difficult to make sense of their often-conflicting images, sounds, and messages.  This course challenges participants to read music videos as texts by engaging with their visual and auditory materials.  We will explore how the gender, race, and class of video participants shapes meaning, as well as how pacing and editing contribute to (or detract from) a narrative flow. We will also consider the music video in relation to notions of stardom and celebrity, and will speculate on the future of the music video amid drastic changes in the production and marketing of media. The second portion of the course applies these analytical skills to a wide variety of media, including video games, live concert films, film and television music placements, television title sequences and end credits, user generated content, YouTube, remixes and more.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL • FINE ARTS

315 - Musical Theater Performance

The American musical presents unique challenges to performers. They act and they sing, and most importantly, they must act while singing. They also need to understand both the literary and musical meaning of a work of musical theater, and how the two are intertwined. In this course, designed for the novice performer as well as the advanced actor or singer, we focus on the literature of musical theater, introducing students to the art of acting a song. We place character within the context of the music and the story, and explore how the elements of healthy singing (including breath control, phrasing, and placement) express character. Through solo and collaborative selections from contemporary and classic musical theater, we examine the intersection of singing, acting and movement unique to musical theater. Can be repeated one time for credit. Same as THEA 315. Prerequisite Must be at least sophomore status or instructor approval. Prerequisite: at least sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

357 - Composition II

Study of the compositional techniques and resources of the 20th and 21st centuries. Refinement of the composer's stylistic originality, through repertoire study and short compositional exercises. Composition of a substantial original piece for chamber ensemble, working with performers towards a final recital performance. Prerequisite: Music 255, 257, or permission of the instructor. 

374 - Junior Recital Preparation

Preparation for junior recital. Requirements include more extensive practice expectations as well as research and preparation of program notes. Prerequisite: approval of the department. May be repeated once for credit.
2 units

385 - Advanced Topics in the Critical Study of Music

Music Claiming Space
Music can serve as more than just a cultural artifact. Music can also be an epistemological catalyst, connecting societies quickly and transparently to celebrations of, and debates surrounding, shared systems of belief. As such, this course examines the notion of place, how place is made into music, and how music is made into meaning. The objectives of the course are 1. to provide a forum for discussion about the ways in which notions of place are musically rendered; 2. to engage some basic tenets of phenomenological inquiry and reasoning in our learning, writing, and research about music that provide you the chance to critically feel, think, and write about music; and 3. to understand how the relationship between music and place is in dialogue with, and an expression of, extra-musical, global trends.Prerequisite: Freshman may not enroll in this course 

Advanced Topics in the Critical Study of Music: Music Claiming Space 
Music can serve as more than just a cultural artifact. Music can also be an epistemological catalyst, connecting societies quickly and transparently to celebrations of, and debates surrounding, shared systems of belief. As such, this course examines the notion of place, how place is made into music, and how music is made into meaning. The objectives of the course are 1. to provide a forum for discussion about the ways in which notions of place are musically rendered; 2. to engage some basic tenets of phenomenological inquiry and reasoning in our learning, writing, and research about music that provide you the chance to critically feel, think, and write about music; and 3. t ounderstand how the relationship between music and place is in dialogue with, and an expression of, extramusical, global trends. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Vienna, 1890-1914
Together, the music of Gustav Mahler and of Arnold Schoenberg marks the turning point from Romanticism to Modernism. In order to understand their music and this cultural shift, we must understand the extraordinary time and place where they lived and worked. This multidisciplinary course takes the crucible that was fin-de-siècle Vienna as its object of study, beginning with the city’s 1890-92 expansion to include the suburbs south of the Danube, to the beginning of World War I, which brought an end to the Hapsburg dynasty and Austria-Hungary. Our approach to studying Vienna will be prismatic: each week will consist of one seminar on its music and one seminar lecture on one of the following aspects of the city at this time: urban planning, economics, political history, architecture, art, dance, psychology, medicine, science, and religion. The last three weeks on campus will be devoted to German language instruction and individual research projects. The on-campus component of the course will culminate in transforming Bird Studio into a Viennese coffee house, which will welcome the campus community and during which students must impersonate, through knowledgeable conversation, a contemporaneous Viennese figure central to their field of research. This immersive on-campus study will crescendo to the downbeat of the course: three days after Commencement, we will board a flight for Vienna for three weeks of intensive study there, convening as a class each day, attending lectures, classes (including a cooking class!), and concerts, and visiting the historical, cultural, and musical sites we studied on campus. We will take three, three-hour guided walking tours, of architectural monuments, of historical (including music-historical) monuments, and of Viennese coffee houses. Arriving in during the cultural festival Vienna Festival Weeks, we will attend as many of its offerings as time permits. Students must apply and participate in an interview for this course, whose enrollment will be limited to sixteen students. Frosh may not apply for this course. Here is the link for the application and instructions: [link]. The firm deadline for the application is [date]. I will contact you for an interview the day after the deadline. Prerequisite: sophomore standing
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS and REGIONAL FOCUS

386 - Performance and Politics of the U.S.-Mexico Border

This course examines the ways that the United States-Mexico border has been represented as a space of violence and creativity, limits and possibility in music, theater, literature, and film. Shuttling back and forth between the border as a geopolitical boundary and as a trope of emergent identity, the cultural texts we will examine challenge dominant narratives of national belonging, self and other, gender and racial hierarchy, and economic marginalization. Engaging in a historically situated analysis of cultural texts that offer alternative perspectives on the lived experiences of those who inhabit the dynamic contact zone between the United States and Mexico, students will critically engage the concepts and issues that have shaped the master narrative of the border. In addition to writing a twelve-page research paper, students will produce a multimedia digital project. Not open to 1st year students. 
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: GLOBAL CONNECTIONS and FINE ARTS

390 - Junior Seminar in Music

Topics in Musical Analysis.

Topics in Music Analysis is a small, discussion-oriented seminar emphasizing analytic and critical approaches to a musical topic. prerequisite: Junior standing


Igor Stravinsky. In celebration of the 100th anniversary of Stravinsky's iconic Rite of Spring (1913), this course examines the musical works by Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971). We will investigate his idiomatic musical language with respect to his distinctive use of structure, metrical displacement and elements of rhythm and pitch, and also consider how these are employed within the immense range of his oeuvre. Students will become familiar with the core of the Stravinskian theoretical literature, as well as with Stravinsky’s own polemical writings. Among the topics and repertoire covered will be the early Russian ballets (including the scandalous premiere of The Rite of Spring); the short piano pieces and ragtime-influenced works of the late 1910s; several neoclassical works of the 1920s-30s; and finally his collaboration with Hollywood movie producers and late exploration into serial techniques during his final decades spent in the United States. Students will use a variety of analytical methods in analytic assignments, in-class presentations, and an argument-driven research paper. The course will be supplemented by guest lecturers and class field trips.

397 - Independent Study in Music

2 or 4 units

474 - Senior Comprehensive Preparation in Music

This course provides individual coaching and advisement to students preparing to present their senior comprehensive project. May be repeated once for credit Prerequisite: Junior Standing
2 units

490 - Senior Seminar in Music

In this fall semester seminar students will work through a staged process to complete a draft of their senior comprehensive paper. In this critical, persuasive essay students will engage recent scholarship in the fields of musicology, ethnomusicology and/or music theory in order to develop and support an original thesis. Students undertaking research and/or fieldwork for their senior comprehensive projects will produce a complete draft of their twenty-five page (6,250 word) critical essay. Students undertaking composition, conducting, instrumental or vocal recitals for their student comprehensive project will write a thesis-driven, ten-page (2,500 word) paper that explores a musical topic related to the materials they will present. Recitalists will also research and produce a draft of their recital program, with program notes, while composers will complete their recital portfolio and begin work on their recital program. Over the course of the semester students will discuss and share their work, as well as analyze and discuss exemplary academic papers, program notes, liner notes, and music reviews in order to develop their ability to write about music for academic and non-academic audiences in compelling ways.  Prerequisite: junior standing

Ensembles

Ensemble membership is open to all students of the college by audition. All ensembles are graded Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit. 

120 - College Chorus

Study and performance of choral music. Development of singing ability and sight-reading skills through the preparation and performance of works for full chorus. The chorus rehearses one evening each week and performs on-campus each semester. Students may enroll for one or both semesters. Prerequisite: Enrollment is by audition with the instructor during the first week of each semester. No previous musical experience required.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

121 - Women's Glee Club

Advanced study and performance of choral music. Emphasis is placed on the more difficult traditional choral repertoire, but the study of world music and popular music is included. Includes many performances with Men's Glee Club, both on and off campus. Enrollment is for the full year and is by audition during the first week of the fall semester. 2 hours rehearsal per week plus 2.5 hours rehearsal per week with Men's Glee Club. Sight reading ability and previous musical experience highly recommended.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

122 - Men's Glee Club

Advanced study and performance of choral music. Emphasis is placed on the more difficult traditional choral repertoire, but the study of world music and popular music is included. Includes many performances with the Women's Glee Club, both on and off campus. Enrollment is for the full year and is by audition during the first week of the fall semester. 2 hours rehearsal per week plus 2.5 hours rehearsal per week with Women's Glee Club. Sight reading ability and previous musical experience highly recommended.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

123 - Afro-Cuban Drumming

Semester-long instruction with music tradition-bearers allows students to develop the technique and language to approach musical styles from outside the Western art music canon, while exposing them to alternative modes of musical pedagogy. In addition to practicing secular rumba drumming, students will study the sacred rhythms of Santería and learn to sing the songs of the Orishas in the Yoruba dialect of Lucumi. In addition to weekly rehearsals with the ensemble, students will be expected to practice on their own and to participate in a public performance at the end of the semester. No prior music experience is required.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT MET PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

124 - Son Jarocho Ensemble

124. SON JAROCHO ENSEMBLE
Son Jarocho Ensemble introduces students to the songs and instrumental techniques of son jarocho, a musical genre from Veracruz, Mexico that mixes indigenous Mexican, African, Spanish and Arabic sounds. The course will be taught by a master musician who brings over twenty years of musical experience to his classes. Students will learn to play jarana, the eight-stringed guitar that provides the harmonic scaffold for son jarocho. In addition to weekly rehearsals with the ensemble, students will be expected to practice on their own and to participate in a public performance at the end of the semester. No prior music experience is required.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT MET PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

125 - Orchestra

A symphonic ensemble for qualified instrumentalists from the college communities of Occidental and the California Institute of Technology (students, faculty, staff, and their families). The orchestra presents several concerts on both campuses each year.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS PARTIAL

126 - Concert Band

A symphonic wind ensemble for qualified instrumentalists from the college communities of Occidental and the California Institute of Technology (students, faculty, staff and their families). The Band presents concerts on both campuses during the year. Prerequisite: audition with instructor.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

127 - Jazz Ensemble

The Occidental Jazz Ensemble consists of instrumentalists from Occidental who are interested in performing jazz of various styles. Charts and styles are determined according to the instrumentalists in the ensemble and their particular jazz interests. The Jazz Ensemble presents several concerts during the academic year. Enrollment is by audition with the instructor.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

129 - Chamber Music

Study and performance of chamber music for diverse combinations of instruments and voices. Prerequisite: audition during the first week of the semester.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

Applied Music

Instruction in applied music is available to all students of the College. Information regarding scholarships for applied music study is available at the Music Department office.

Applied Music Fees per semester:

Half-hour private lessons: $375.00
One-hour private lessons: $750.00
Class lessons in electronic music, voice, piano, guitar, jazz improvisation, Alexander Technique: $195.00

Fees apply to all students regardless of full or part-time status.

Policies for Applied Music Lessons: Private lessons in instruments and voice are offered for one unit of credit, and can be taken for either one half-hour or one hour a week. Private applied music lessons are assigned a letter grade at the end of the semester. Students who are not music majors, or who are not receiving applied music scholarships, are welcome to elect CR/NC grading by the published deadline if their instructor approves. Please be sure to file the necessary form from the Registrar by the published deadline if you are interested in this option.

Applied music class lessons (group lessons) require a minimum of four students. If fewer than four students sign up for the class, the registered students will be contacted and given the option of enrolling in private lessons or dropping the course. All applied music class lessons are graded Credit/No Credit.

Students enroll for class and private applied music lessons through the regular online registration process or with an ADD form each term. Class and private applied music lessons and classes must be added by September 14, 2012 (Fall), and February 1, 2013 (Spring). Your instructor will contact you to schedule your lessons. All music majors, and all students receiving an applied music scholarship will perform a jury at the end of each semester of study (excluding semesters in which a student is performing a junior or senior recital). Applied music lessons may be repeated for credit.

Refunds for class and private applied music lessons will not be given after the third week of each semester. Students who elect to drop must complete an ADD/DROP form and submit it to the Registrar no later than September 21, 2012 (Fall) or February 8, 2013 (Spring). Any student who drops class or private applied lessons after these dates will be billed for the FULL lesson fee(s) for that semester. If a student drops class or private applied music lessons on or before each semester's deadline, s/he will be billed for the number of lessons taken up to that time.

100 - Electronic Music Class

An introduction to the use of the Occidental electronic music studio and the creation of electronic music with synthesizers, computer and digital recorders. Fee: $195.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

101 - Voice Class

Fundamentals of singing: voice production, diction, repertoire, musicianship.
Recommended as preparation for private lessons. Fee: $195.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

102 - Piano Class

Basic keyboard technique at the beginning through lower intermediate level. Fee: $195. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis only.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

103 - Classic Guitar Class (Beginning)

An introduction to classical guitar including basic technique and musicianship. The traditional repertoire as well as 20th century and flamenco will be explored. Fee: $195.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

104 - Classical Guitar Class (Intermediate)

A further exploration of classical guitar with emphasis on a thorough treatment of musicianship, technique, and expansion of the repertoire for the guitar soloist. Prerequisite: Music 133 or permission of instructor. Fee: $195.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

105 - Alexander Technique Class

The Alexander Technique helps students move naturally. They learn to prevent excess tension and replace it with a more effectively balanced movement pattern throughout the body. Does not satisfy Music Major applied music requirement. Fee: $195.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

201-280 - Private Applied Music Lessons

All private applied music lessons are one unit each, whether the duration of the lessons is one-half hour or one hour per week. Private applied study carries a fee of $375 (1/2-hour lessons) or $750 (one ­hour lessons).

MUSA 201 PIANO (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 202 PIANO (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 203 JAZZ PIANO (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 204 JAZZ PIANO (1­hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 205 PIANO IMPROVISATION (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 206 PIANO IMPROVISATION (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 208 COLLABORATIVE PIANO (1-hour lessons)
Prerequisite: two semesters of applied piano study at Occidental, or permission of instructor.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 211 VOICE (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 212 VOICE (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 213 JAZZ VOICE (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 214 JASS VOICE (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 221 FLUTE (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 222 FLUTE (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 223 OBOE (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 224 OBOE (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 225 CLARINET (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 226 CLARINET (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 227 BASSOON (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 228 BASSOON (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 229 CLASSICAL SAXOPHONE (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 230 CLASSICAL SAXOPHONE (1-­hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 231 JAZZ SAXOPHONE (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 232 JAZZ SAXOPHONE (1-­hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 241 FRENCH HORN (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 242 FRENCH HORN (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 243 TRUMPET (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 244 TRUMPET (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 245 TROMBONE (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 246 TROMBONE (1­hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 247 TUBA (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 248 TUBA (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 251 PERCUSSION (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 252 PERCUSSION (1­hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 253 HARP (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 254 HARP (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 261 VIOLIN (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 262 VIOLIN (1-hour lessons)
Prerequisite: prior experience playing the violin. 
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 265 CELLO (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 266 CELLO (1-hour lessons)
Prerequisite: prior experience playing the cello.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 267 STRING BASS (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 268 STRING BASS (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 269 ELECTRIC BASS (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 270 ELECTRIC BASS (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 271 CLASSICAL GUITAR (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 272 CLASSICAL GUITAR (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 273 JAZZ GUITAR (1/2-hour lessons) / MUSA 274 JAZZ GUITAR (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

MUSA 276 ADV. CLASSICAL GUITAR (1-hour lessons)
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

 

Faculty

Regular Faculty

David Kasunic, chair

Associate Professor, Music

B.A., Amherst College; M.F.A., Ph.D.; Princeton University

Irene Girton

Professor, Music

B.Music, Oberlin College Conservatory of Music; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University

Shanna Lorenz

Assistant Professor, Music; Advisory Committee, Latino/a and Latin American Studies

B.A., Reed College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D. New York University

On Special Appointment

Joe Addington

Adjunct Instructor, Music

William Bing

Adjunct Instructor, Music

M.M., USC; B.M., University of Michigan

Cesar Castro

Adjunct Instructor, Music

Shawn Costantino

Jazz Ensemble Director; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Music

B.Mus., Studio Music and Jazz, University of Miami; MM, Jazz Studies, De Paul University

Sonia Marie De Leon de Vega

Adjunct Instructor, Music

Edmond Johnson

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Music

B.A., Lawrence University; M.A., Ph.D., UC Santa Barbara

Desiree La Vertu

Director of Choral Music, Music

B.Mus., CSU Fullerton; M.M. University of Nevada, Reno

Jennifer Logan

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Music

B.A., M.A., Cal State Fresno; Ph.D., UC Santa Barbara

Gloria Lum

Adjunct Instructor, Music

B.A., University of Southern California

Stephanie O’Keefe

Adjunct Instructor, Music

Applied Music Major, University of Illinois; Applied Music Major, University of Arizona; Applied Music Major, University of Nevada

G. Simeon Pillich

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Music

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., UCLA

Malia Roberson

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Music

BA, MA (Music, Piano Performance), UC Santa Cruz; Ph.D. (Music Theory), UCSB