Theater

Overview | Requirements | Courses | Faculty

Overview

Students in the Department of Theater explore the art of theater through theory, performance, and production. Each student experiences the essentially collaborative nature of theater through participation in theater productions. Our curriculum enables students to develop a rich understanding of both the enactment of the written word and the essence of theatrical expression. In addition to preparing our students for further study and related careers in theater or film, we encourage each student to explore ideas of self and community and to express these discoveries through one or more aspects of theater.

Because the development of a theater artist is enhanced by time as well as training, we encourage students considering a Theater major or minor to consult with department faculty and begin taking courses in the first year. (The curriculum, however, is structured to enable an industrious student to begin at a later time and complete the major by the end of the fourth year.)

Students are encouraged to broaden their self-discovery through opportunities for Community Based Learning and through internships. The Department has rich, ongoing relationships with Los Angeles theater companies, providing opportunities for internships and independent study. Artists from these companies are frequent and regular guest artists for productions and as guest instructors.

While the major is designed to prepare students for successful careers in theater and film, it provides also, in conjunction with study in other areas of the liberal arts, unique and effective preparation for success in such diverse fields as business, law, communications, arts administration, education, and social service.

Requirements

MAJOR: The major consists of 44 units. A minimum of 2 units must consist of two semesters of Production Lab (Theater 121 or 122) in two different areas (one must be a running crew.) The 121/122 requirement must be completed by the end of the junior year. Another 2 units may consist of two semesters of Performance Lab (211). The Department has established standards of excellence in theoretical analysis, performance, and production that our students meet by completing a comprehensive project in the senior year. Information concerning all phases of the senior project can be obtained from the Department Chair.

The Department welcomes interdisciplinary programs and double majors, and will work carefully with students interested in such programs. Up to 8 units of select courses from Film, Music, Studio Art, Art History, and Dramatic Literature may be applied to the Theater Major in consultation with the department chair.Students who major in the Department of Theater pursue the following program of study: Theater 101; Theater 110; Theater 120; two semesters of Theater 121 and/or 122; Theater 175; Theater 210; Theater 301; four units of coursework in design or technical theater selected from Theater 225, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 250, 275, 320, 325, 330, 335, 346, 370 and 375; and at least 16 units from other Theater or approved interdisciplinary courses.

WRITING REQUIREMENT: Students majoring in Theater will fulfill Occidental College's 3rd year writing requirement by completing a significant research and analytical paper as part of Theater 301 or 302. Students should familiarize themselves with the departmental requirement at the time of declaring the major. See the Writing Program and consult the department chair for additional information.

MINOR: The minor consists of a minimum of 20 units: Theater 101, 110, 120, either 175 or 210, two semesters of 121 (one of which must be a running crew), and four additional units from the Theater curriculum.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION: The department accomplishes the college objectives for the Senior Comprehensive by having each candidate, having completed the 121/122 requirement, (1) propose a creative or research project; (2) submit a paper of research and/or preparation during the comprehensive process, to be discussed with the faculty; and (3) execute the project. Projects may include but are not limited to acting, directing, design, playwriting, stage management, technical direction, theater management, and scholarly research. See the department for details.

HONORS: To receive College Honors in the department of Theater, the student must be a major and achieve a 3.50 grade point average in departmental courses. In addition the student must achieve a 3.25 grade point average overall, and receive a grade of Pass with Distinction on the senior comprehensive project. See the Honors Program for additional information.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS: In the summer, Occidental College hosts the annual Occidental Children's Theater at the Remsen Bird Hillside Amphitheater. Academic credit is available for this program through Theater 197 or 397. Off-campus internships in professional theater and film may be arranged during the academic year or summer through the Department of Theater and the Career Development Center. Support for undergraduate research and travel are available both during the academic year and during the summer. Contact the Department Chair and the Undergraduate Research Center for more information. We encourage Theater students to participate in study abroad. Information on approved programs is available through the International Programs Office. Credit toward the major may be available.

Courses

101 - Dramatic Literature: The Art of Reading Scripts

In this course, we study five classic and contemporary theatrical scripts, investigating the relationship of script construction, theatrical enactment and audience response.  Our discussions explore the elements of theatrical writing: character, language, themes, and conceptual possibilities; and we enhance our understanding through creative projects and attending live performances in the greater Los Angeles area.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

110 - Introduction to Performance

This course is the foundation of our acting program. In it, our students explore how an actor gives life to words and moves from a script to performance. Students work with Shakespeare’s sonnets as well as contemporary pieces to develop physical and verbal facility as well as interpretive skill. This course is intended for first and second year students. Juniors and seniors may enroll with the permission of the instructor. There is a ticket fee of $50 for the course.
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

120 - Introduction to Technical Theater

In this course, we introduce students to many of the different areas of theater production, including drafting, lighting equipment, rigging practices, and special effects—with a primary focus on scenic construction. The course includes a laboratory through which techniques taught in class are applied. The laboratory averages 40 hours over the semester, with laboratory schedules to be arranged with the instructor. Students are required to purchase some materials for this course.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

121 - Production Laboratory

Our production laboratories are applied courses for student designers, technicians, and managers who are on crews of productions directed, designed, or directly supervised by faculty members in the department. In order to complete a theater major, students are required to complete production laboratories in two separate areas.  One of these areas is a running crew for a department production. The laboratories are offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit. The course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Theater 120 or permission of the instructor
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

122 - Intensive Production Laboratory

These laboratories are designed for our student designers, technicians, and managers who are given primary responsibility on production crews directly supervised by faculty members in the department. In the laboratories, students pursue additional research and practical applications beyond the requirements of Theater 121, and may use this course to meet one of the 121 requirements for a major or minor.  The laboratories are offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

130 - Modern Dance

In this course, students study the theory and apply the methodology of the Jose Limón Technique. Developed from the principles of fall and recovery, the Limón Technique is built upon motion through succession, suspension, alignment and opposition. The course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS

131 - Beginning Jazz and Tap Dance

In this course, students learn the fundamentals of jazz and tap dance with an emphasis on body alignment, strength, flexibility, rhythm and coordination. During the semester, we experiment with lyrical and contemporary jazz combinations as well as tap variations designed to develop musicality, self-expression and performance skills. The course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

133 - Beginning Tai Chi

Tai Chi Chuan is the study and practice of slow controlled movement, breathing and realignment of the body. Sometimes referred to as standing yoga, Tai Chi Chuan has been practiced for centuries for its many benefits, including stress management, disease prevention and increase in energy. Our focus in this class is on relaxation, gentle movement and meditation. There is a course fee of $85; and this course may be repeated for credit.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

134 - Beginning Ballet

In Beginning Ballet, we study the principles and execute the techniques of ballet based on the Vaganova method. Students are taught the fundamentals and elementary vocabulary of ballet through barre, center and traveling combinations and exercises. The course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

137 - Choreography

This is an introduction to a study of choreography based on the Nikolais/Mettler methods of creating dances. Our tools include the manipulation of motion through space, time, shape and energy volumes within the context of the body and its surroundings; and our work culminates with studio performances of pieces choreographed by the students in the class. The course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

139 - African Dance

Exploring the richness of African Dance traditions from four African regions, this course is devoted to the study of authentic dances and songs from Africa, as well as their historical and cultural contexts. We begin with exercises to condition our bodies for the rigor of the African Dance forms—developing strength, stamina, coordination, flexibility and rhythmic awareness, and move to the informed and joyous practice of the dances. The course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

140 - Afro-Caribbean Dance

Students in this course are introduced to fundamental Afro-Caribbean dance techniques and complex body isolations.  We explore dances that reflect the various African influences upon the Caribbean—particularly upon Cuba, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and Trinidad and Tobago. As we move through the semester, students in the class acquire understanding of the particular relationship of the music to the dances as well as a broad understanding of the cultural, historical and social content of the dances of the Caribbean. The course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

141 - Social Dances

We study and practice some of the most popular dance forms of the twentieth century. Through theater, film and television, many of these dances have expressed the spirit and the style, and particularly the romantic temper, of their times: from the quick steps of the Fred Astaire films to the swing dancing in Malcolm X and A League of Their Own and the tango of The Scent of a Woman.  The dances taught include fox trot, waltz, swing and tango. We strongly recommend this class for our student actors. The course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

142 - Folk and Historical Dance

In this course, students study folk and historical dances drawn from Eastern and Western Europe, along with folk dances of the United States derived from those traditions. Performance opportunities may include Viennese waltz and dance-based children’s theater. The course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

143 - Latin Dance

Students explore the rich traditions of Latin Dance as well as the influence and effect of the dances throughout popularWestern culture. Students embrace through performance various dance forms developed in Mexico and throughout Central and Latin America, and study the place and importance of the dances in Latin cultures.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS PARTIAL

175 - Introduction to Design

This is our introductory design course, helping all its students acquire grounding in aesthetics and a critical eye that will serve them throughout their lives, and preparing students interested in becoming designers for the specializations offered in later classes.  In this class, we teach the elements of design and the principles of composition that apply to theater and film. Over the semester, our students come to understand and acquire the skills to develop visual expressions of the meaning of play and film scripts. They work both individually and in groups through a series of design projects that incorporate script analysis, and presentation and research techniques. This course is intended for first and second year students. Juniors and seniors may enroll with the permission of the instructor. There is a ticket fee of $50 for the course.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

190 - Theater Now: Los Angeles

Through readings, guest speakers and attending live events, students explore theater throughout Los Angeles. And in that exploration they critically examine the collaborative roles of theater artists and the active role of the audience in live theater. In interactions with the creative teams from selected productions, both on and off campus, we develop an insider’s understanding of theatrical creation. There is a ticket fee of $75 for the course.
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

197 - Independent Study in Theater

Second year students pursue independent courses or projects guided by a theater faculty member. This course is available only to second year students.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
 
2 units or 4 units

201 - Alternative Voices in American Theater

We study the artistry of contemporary theatrical movements as well as American writers from divergent cultural and aesthetic backgrounds. By looking at movements and artists in their cultural and social contexts, we explore the sources, the aims, and the artistic strategies of their works, while developing an understanding of important new voices in American Theater. The focus of the class will vary from year to year.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS and US DIVERSITY

202 - Shakespeare's Scripts

Looking at a small number of Shakespeare’s scripts from the vantages of actor, director and playwright, we examine the unique and complex relationship between Shakespeare’s literary constructions and their possible performances. We analyze how through language and structure he develops characters of psychological complexity; how he develops stories from extra-theatrical material; and how, in style and subject matter, his scripts relate to one another. This course offers students a bridge between literary study and theatrical enactment: looking closely at Shakespeare’s designs from the perspective of the theater practitioner—from, in most ways, Shakespeare’s own perspective.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS PRE-1800 REGIONAL FOCUS

203 - Productions in Times of Crisis

In this course, we investigate a variety of 20th and 21st century theatrical productions staged during times of conflict and crisis: on amateur stages in restaurant back rooms, in workers’ clubs and cafes, and in professional and Broadway theaters. From the 1920’s agitation trials (Agitsudy), mass spectacles, and agitprop theater during the Russian Revolution to contemporary theater’s responses to disease, war, racism and social oppression, we examine how artists and activists use theater to respond to social and political unrest: sometimes as a tool to fight oppression; at other times as a tool to encourage obedience and propagate national political ideals; and often as an escape from the discomfort of everyday life. We examine the performance theories and strategies emerging from these theatrical moments as we read the seminal plays of the periods; and as a culmination of theoretical analysis, students in the class develop performance projects responding to a contemporary crisis.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

204 - Comedy and Social Change

In this course, we introduce students to how various comic styles can influence and transform society. In the class we study scripted as well as unscripted forms of performance such as commedia dell’arte, vaudeville, Teatro Campesino style actos , stand-up, sketch comedy, sitcoms and faux news shows. Students develop an understanding of the role of comedy in socio-political critique through research and through the creation of original solo and group performances, culminating in a final cabaret performance. Prerequisite: sophomore standing
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

210 - Acting 1

Acting 1 serves students as an introduction to American behavioral-based actor training: its techniques and theory. We begin with an exploration of self in performance with partnered scenes from American realist scripts. We work through observation and exercises to develop an understanding of action and emotion in the actor’s art.  Our work in the course concludes with the presentation of scenes selected from the plays of Henrik Ibsen. This course is intended for first and second year students. Juniors and seniors may enroll with the permission of the instructor.
Prerequisite: Theater 110
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

211 - Performance Laboratory

Our Performance Laboratory is offered as an applied acting course based upon roles played in our professionally directed Keck Theater productions. This course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit. It is available only with the permission of the instructor
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

212 - Auditioning

In this course, student actors will continue to develop audition techniques introduced in Introduction to Performance and Acting 1, applying them to the standard “general audition” format. In addition, our students learn about the audition and casting process in professional theater through a guest speaker series of casting directors and professional film and stage actors. The course is intended for second and third year students, and is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

213 - Performing History

The convergence of critical thinking, civic engagement, and storytelling is the heart of this course. During the semester, students in the class develop solo performance pieces based upon their own historical research, and at the end of the semester perform them in a rehearsal setting for an open audience. This course is available through an interview, and the permission of the instructor.
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

215 - Acting for the Camera

Working with selected scripts from the best of recent and contemporary screenplays, our students develop techniques for working in front of a camera as a specific application of the work of both Acting 1 and Acting 2.  There is a materials fee of $60 for this course.
Prerequisite: Theater 210 or permission of the Instructor; Theater 310 is strongly recommended as preparation.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

225 - Scene Painting

In this course, we introduce students to a variety of scenic techniques and materials employed in theatrical scene painting, with aesthetic theory and period styles serving as the foundation of the work. Special materials are purchased for the students of the course. There is a materials fee of $65 for this course.
Prerequisite: Theater 120 or 175, or the permission of the instructor
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

231 - Intermediate Jazz and Tap Dance

Students with basic experience in jazz and tap dancing learn intermediate and advanced techniques in this course. This course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: two semesters of Theater 131 or permission of the instructor

1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

233 - Advanced Tai Chi

In this course, students with a basic grounding in the discipline learn more advanced techniques of Tai Chi Chuan, the study of slow controlled movement, breathing and realignment of the body. There is a course fee of $85. This course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: two semesters of Theater 133 or permission of the instructor

1 unit
CORE REQUIREMNT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

234 - Intermediate Ballet

Students develop and refine ballet technique based on the Vaganova Method. This course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: two semesters of Theater 134 or permission of the instructor
1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

237 - Intermediate Choreography

Building upon the work from Beginning Choreography, students develop more sophisticated choreographic strategies, language and techniques with an emphasis on group choreography, including site-specific work and studio performances. This course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Theater 137 or permission of the instructor
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

240 - Intermediate Afro-Caribbean Dance

We move students further along in the study of movement covering the diverse Caribbean region from Cuba to Puerto Rico, Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago. As students develop a body of choreographic work, they will learn improvisational techniques for soloing along with the place and importance of the Yoruba-based pantheon in the work. Matching specific dance steps to specific drum rhythms, students learn to sing Yoruban songs as they perform the dances.
This course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: two semesters of Theater 140 or permission of the instructor

1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

244 - Stage Management

Our stage management course introduces students to the art and techniques of stage management, helping them acquire the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills to manage theatrical productions from casting through performance.
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

245 - Stage Makeup

Students in Stage Makeup learn the fundamentals of makeup design for the theater. We cover a number of makeup techniques, including basic, three-dimensional, corrective, glamour, character, and old-age makeups as well as the creation of special makeup effects. During the semester, our students put theory into practice as they create a variety of practical makeup designs.
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

246 - Costume Construction

In Costume Construction, students acquire the skills necessary to construct basic garments for the stage. At the end of the course, each student will build a costume piece.
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

248 - Sound Design for Theater, Dance, and Multimedia

We introduce students to the theory and application of sound and music as elements of design for theater, dance and other collaborative multimedia dramatic forms. Throughout the semester, we address fundamental issues of sound design: including script analysis, conceptual approaches to sound, music underscoring, working with audio equipment, and sound editing. Over the semester, our students learn how to work within a creative team of designers coordinating the many design elements of various dramatic forms.
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

250 - Period Styles for Stage and Screen

We explore some of the shifting styles of European and American culture from the 15th through the 20th centuries as those styles express ways of apprehending and defining the world. Social behaviors, etiquette, deportment, fashions, public and private spaces, furniture and art are examined as they are expressed and reflected on stage and screen, with a focus on analyzing the connections between movement and social environment.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS and GLOBAL COMNNECTIONS

260 - Children's Theater, 3rd Grade

These separate applied workshops in children’s theater focus on work with elementary school children. We study age-appropriate methods of integrating theater into the elementary school curriculum. In four intensive sessions, our students learn five workshops geared in Theater 260 to third grade, after which, under the instructor’s supervision, they guide local elementary school classes through the curriculum.
Prerequisite: Theater 110 or permission of the instructor
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

261 - Children's Theater, 5th Grade

These separate applied workshops in children's theater focus on work with elementary school children. We study age-appropriate methods of integrating theater into the elementary school curriculum. In four intensive sessions, students learn five workshops geared to the fifth grade, after which, under the instructor's supervision, they guide local elementary school classes through the curriculum. Prerequisite: Theater 110 or permission of instructor. Enrollment is limited. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis only.
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIAL: FINE ARTS 

275 - Scenic Design

Our course in scenic design provides intermediate training in technique and exploration of theory specifically aimed at designing scenery for the theater. Our students learn several methods for developing and communicating their design ideas, including basic drawing and drafting concepts, CAD drafting using VectorWorks, and both physical and digital model-making. There is a materials fee of $60 for this course.
Prerequisite: Theater 120 or Theater 175, or permission of the instructor

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

301 - Topics in Theater History

In this course, we examine theatrical performance within historical and cultural contexts. Theater literature, performance practices and theater architecture are studied within the perspectives of the times and cultures from which theatrical expressions arise.  Periods and cultures studied will vary each year.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS PRE-1800 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

302 - Twentieth Century Playwrights

During the semester, we study the works of various twentieth century playwrights. Different years will feature different playwrights: so one semester might look at farceurs, another semester political pioneers, and another European iconoclasts. In addition to reading several scripts by each playwright, our students also attend live performances, prepare research projects, and create performance projects in response to the semester’s writers. Students may use this course to fulfill the Junior Writing Requirement for the Theater Major. There is a ticket fee of $50 for the course.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS, INTERCULTURAL and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

303 - Latina/o Theater

The focus of this course is on the history, literature, and performance practice of Latina/o theater in the United States. Students will read the work of a number of Latina/o playwrights with particular focus on contemporary playwrights. We will ask questions about how theater is labeled Latina/o and whether it exists on the margins or within the mainstream of US theater. We will consider common themes and forms shared by these works as well as the ways in which they stand apart, creating a diversity of voices. Secondary readings will provide context for our investigation into the socio-political contexts of these works, while play attendance will keep our focus on these plays as performance. There is a ticket fee of $50 for the course.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

310 - Acting 2

By looking carefully at the psychology of performance, we introduce our acting students to an alternative to Stanislavski-based acting systems or methods. Students develop an understanding of impulse, desire and action in everyday life, along with an understanding of the heightened consciousness of artists at play. In the process, they learn how to act with increased freedom and to create characters with genuine psychological complexity while developing a technique equally adaptable to theater and film. Over a semester, students in the class follow a path from improvisation through play with language to develop roles from Chekhov and various classical and contemporary playwrights.
Prerequisite: Theater 110, 210 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment in this course may be based on an audition/interview process.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

311 - Intensive Performance Laboratory

Our upper-division applied acting course is available for students performing significant roles in professionally directed Theater Department productions. This course is offered only for grades of Credit/No Credit, and may be repeated for credit. It is available only with permission of the instructor
2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

315 - Musical Theater Performance

The American musical presents unique challenges to performers. They act and they sing, and most importantly, they must act while singing. They also need to understand both the literary and musical meaning of a work of musical theater, and how the two are intertwined. In this course, designed for the novice performer as well as the advanced actor or singer, we focus on the literature of musical theater, introducing students to the art of acting a song. We place character within the context of the music and the story, and explore how the elements of healthy singing (including breath control, phrasing, and placement) express character. Through solo and collaborative selections from contemporary and classic musical theater, we examine the intersection of singing, acting and movement unique to musical theater. Can be repeated one time for credit. Same as MUSC 315. Prerequisite Must be at least sophomore status or instructor approval. Prerequisite: at least sophomore standing or permission of the instructor.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

316 - Performing Shakespeare

In this culmination of the Theater Department’s acting sequence, our students explore through practice the demands Shakespeare’s scripts make upon actors. During the semester, students in the class work with five to six of Shakespeare’s scripts from various genres in order to develop facility with Shakespeare’s verse and prose in performance.
Prerequisite: Theater 202 and Theater 310, or permission of the instructor
CORE REQUIREM: FINE ARTS PRE-1800 REGIONAL FOCUS

320 - Advanced Technical Theater

Pursuing knowledge and skill beyond that acquired in Introduction to Technical Theater, our students learn in this course advanced building techniques, metal working theory and welding, and furniture construction and repair.  Students in the class will also act as crew chiefs for Theater Department productions. Some materials will need to be purchased for the course.
Prerequisite: Theater 120 and permission of the instructor
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

321 - Portfolios

We help our students in this course develop the skills to analyze, archive, and document their creative and technical work; and we introduce them to various techniques for public presentation of the record of their work.
Prerequisite: Theater 120 or 175, or permission of the instructor

1 unit
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

325 - Lighting Design

Studying the theories, the psychological foundations, and techniques of lighting design for the theater, our students develop in this course an intellectual and practical foundation of this significant, and accessible, area of theater design. During the semester, we guide students in the class through both individual and group design projects. There is a material/tickets fee of $60 for this course, which includes one two-hour laboratory session each week.
Prerequisite: Theater 120 or Theater 175, or permission of the instructor

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

330 - Producing the Live Event

Students in this course analyze the various requirements for producing live performance events. In developing solutions to the many difficulties presented by live events, we examine in particular the artistic, legal, and financial responsibilities of the producer. Through projects, case studies and research, our students look at the creative and practical aspects of live presentations as they come to understand the myriad considerations required to successfully produce live performances for theater, music and other cultural events.
Prerequisite: Theater 120 and at least second-year standing, or permission of the instructor.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

370 - Costume Design

We introduce our students to the goals, processes and techniques of costume design. And as students conceptualize, research and design costumes for a variety of plays, they become familiar with the basic components of the discipline. Although an introduction to, and practice with, various sketching and rendering approaches is an element of the course, we do not require specific prior drawing experience.
Prerequisite: Theater 175 or Art S106, or permission of the instructor
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

375 - Advanced Scenic Design

For our advanced design students, this project-based course continues an investigation of visual concepts and techniques for scenic design. We work specifically to tie the collaborative design process to scripts, actors, and the visions of directors as essential elements in the development of designs. There is a ticket/materials fee of $60 for this course.
Prerequisite: Theater 175 or 275, or permission of the instructor

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

380 - Playwriting

We introduce our students in Playwriting to the art of writing for theater. Through a series of weekly creative writing assignments, students in the class develop the skills to construct the structures and craft the dialogue of play scripts. As a final project, each student develops and completes a one-act play. There is a ticket fee of $50 for the course.
Prerequisite: at least second-year standing, or permission of the instructor

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

390 - Advanced Projects in Theater

For advanced theater students, we offer an applied course for significant work undertaken in performance, design, technical theater, or management in faculty-supervised projects. A student enrolled in this course works directly with a faculty mentor in the design and execution of the individual project.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor; and the course may be repeated once for credit
Section 1- Advanced Projects in Theater: Story/Voice/Community
Section 2- On-campus projects

2 units
CORE REQUIREMENT PARTIALLY MET: FINE ARTS

397 - Independent Study in Theater

Our junior and senior students have the opportunity for independent study at an advanced level. This option is only open to juniors and seniors.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
2 units or 4 units

410 - Directing

We introduce students to the art of directing. Our students explore the directing processes of script analysis, casting, working with actors, manipulation of space, use of sound and images, developing designs and mounting productions for theater. During the semester, students in the class stage two performance sequences: one in a classroom format, the other produced on the Keck stage.
Prerequisite: Theater 120, 310 and permission of the instructor. Theater 316 is strongly recommended for preparation. This course may be repeated for credit.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: FINE ARTS

490 - Senior Seminar in Theater

This is a course for students engaged in senior comprehensive projects.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor

 

 

Faculty

Regular Faculty

John Bouchard, chair

Professor, Theater

B.A., UC Santa Barbara; M.A., Ph.D., Rice University

Jamie Angell

Full Time Non Tenure Track Associate Professor, Theater

B.A., Dartmouth College; M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts

Brian Fitzmorris

Professor of the Practice, Theater

B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University

Alan Freeman

Professor Emeritus, Theater

A.B., M.A., Occidental College; M.F.A., American Film Institute

Susan Gratch

Professor, Theater

B.A., M.F.A., University of Michigan

On Special Appointment

Teresia Brooks

Adjunct Instructor, Theater

B.A., Spelman College

Jill Gold

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Theater

A.B., Occidental College

Sarah Kozinn

Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Theater

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., New York University, Ph.D., New York University

Laural Meade

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Theater

A.B., Occidental College; M.F.A., UCLA

Francisco Martinez

Adjunct Instructor, Theater

Tom Slotten

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Theater

B.G.S., University of Michigan; M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts