Politics

Courses

Departmental Core

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101 - American Politics and Public Policy

This course introduces students to the study of politics, the discipline of political science, and the development of public policy. Politics involves the study of power, influence, and ideas in public and private life, at the personal, local, state, national, and international levels. Accordingly, our exploration will examine how power operates in a variety of settings and will include readings in political theory, American politics and law, comparative politics, research methods, and international relations. Prerequisite: Open to Frosh and Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors by instructor permission only.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

300 - Research Methods in Politics and Public Policy

This course is ann introduction to the process of conducting political science research including the formulation of research problems, research design, collection of data, and statistical analysis and interpretation. Participants will learn to analyze political science data using statistical packages in a lab setting. Prerequisites: Politics 101.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: MATH/SCI

American Politics and Public Policy

The following courses are accepted for Politics credit in the American Politics and Public Policy subfield: UEP 204 and 301.

201 - Work and Labor in America

Sooner or later, we all have to work-that is, get a job. Some people even have "careers." And some people are lucky enough to consider the work they do a "vocation" - something that is both intrinsically rewarding and useful to society. Work occupies our best waking hours. For most people, the nature of our work determines the quality of our daily lives. This course will focus on the varieties of work (in different industries and occupations); how people experience their work on the job; how society shapes the work we do; how work shapes our family lives, our friendships, our health, and our self-esteem; and how the nature of work is changing in our increasingly global economy dominated by large corporations and sophisticated technology. We will look at the future of work in the context of our changing economy, values, and technologies. We will pay particular attention to how organized groups ─ labor unions, consumer groups, business associations, and others have influenced the nature of work. We will also explore how government action (public policy) has shaped how our economy works and the rules governing the work we do. These include such matters as wages, hours, flex time, family leave, job security, workplace health and safety, the quality of goods and services, and workplace participation. We will explore such questions as: What makes work satisfying or unsatisfying? How have such ideas as "professional," "career," "working class," "middle class," and "job security" changed? Why do we have increasing problems of low-wage work and even "sweatshops" in a wealthy society? How do such factors as education, skill, race, and gender influence the kinds of work we do and how we experience our work? What are the chances of getting injured or sick because of working in a specific job? How do people balance work/career and family responsibilities? Do people experience work the same way in other democratic countries? What can be done to make the world of work better?
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES

202 - Leadership in the Public and Private Sphere

This seminar investigates leadership – in government, in business, in nonprofits – through the lenses of the social, behavioral and natural sciences, philosophy and the humanities. It surveys and introduces students to theories about leadership, models of leadership, questions about what makes leaders successful or not and in what contexts, and more. The readings are drawn from works from various disciplines that provide perspectives on leadership from those of Plato to those of present day scholars of leadership, management and public policy. Prerequisite: POLS 101

204 - Campaigns and Elections

This course is an exploration and analysis of elections in the U.S., including campaign strategies, role of consultants, media impacts, power of money, the role of public opinion, as well as alternative electoral systems and campaign reform options. Course includes community based learning options in current electoral campaigns, including ballot initiative campaigns as well as candidate efforts. Class will include political leaders and practitioners (elected officials, campaign consultants, etc.) as guest speakers and ongoing analysis of election process and results.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

205 - Latina/a Politics

The purpose of this course is to examine the causes of the political transformation of contemporary Latino communities in the United States and to assess how these communities seek political empowerment as activists and as voter-citizens. The analysis will focus on understanding the institutional contexts of Latino life such as the economy, the state, and the cultural system on the one hand, and the voting behavior and electoral integration of Latinos, on the other hand. This approach concentrates on the identification and examination of the relationships between the following elements: (1) the various waves of Latino/a immigration to the United States; (2) state policies and social responses to Latinos’ presence in the United States.; (3) the formation of a pan-ethnic identity and the tension between this identity and other in-group stratifications based on race, class, gender, national origin, and generation; and (4) the mobilization of Latinos as a voting bloc in congressional and presidential elections.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

206 - Race and American Politics

This course is an exploration of the historical and continuing significance of race in the American political system. The relevance and role of race in shaping political institutions, public opinion, political behavior, and public policy will be examined. Special attention will be given to theoretical debates surrounding the meaning of race and how this changes depending on political context.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

207 - Los Angeles Politics

This is a course about urban politics that takes Los Angeles as its case study. Because of the pattern of growth in the area, Los Angeles is broadly defined to encompass the city, the county, and the region. Since politics is the study of power we will examine power in the context of the city; who has it, who seeks it, how has it shifted over time, and what consequences result from it being exercised? Significant attention will be paid to the agency of those who have at various times had the least power in the city; how are they represented or not represented, how can they influence the exercise of power? Many look to Los Angeles as a paradigmatic city. We will query the appropriateness of this observation as we identify key concepts in urban politics, apply them to Los Angeles, and then consider how much Los Angeles sets, follows, or deviates from trends..
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

208 - Movements for Social Justice

Examination of the impact that social protest movements have had on our society -and lessons that can apply to the current period. Case studies of the agrarian revolt (the Populists), the labor movement, the women's movement, the civil rights movement, the peace movement, the student movement, the environmental movement, and the consumer/neighborhood movement. Topics include: What factors lead people to participate in social movements and political protest? Why do certain historical periods seem to feature large-scale protest and upheaval, while others do not? How are social and political movements related to mainstream politics, such as elections, political parties, voting, and lobbying? What is the role of leaders, activists, and organizers? What strategies and tactics do movements employ? What does "success" mean for a protest movement? Do protest movements make a difference in achieving more social justice and changing public policy? In addition to classroom discussion, attendance at a weekly film series is required.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES

262 - California Politics

An exploration of California's rapidly-changing demographic, cultural, and political environment, including the historic gubernatorial recall election, impact of special interests, population trends, ethnic diversity, environmental challenges, policy issues in education, healthcare, and resource allocation. Students will have the opportunity to do internships at the state or local level in public policy settings. Guest speakers will include elected officials and other political leaders. Service learning/internships will be coordinated with Oxy's Center for Community Based Learning. Can we save the California Dream? Come find out.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES

264 - Disaster Politics: New Orleans in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina

This course is a "hands-on" experience requiring students to live in New Orleans for most of January, working to rebuild and restore the city while studying the politics of disasters, disaster recovery, federalism, local politics, grassroots politics, activism, race, and public policy. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
2 units

295 - Topics in Politics

Lobbying and Advocacy. This course examines the techniques and strategies used by both professional lobbyists and community based advocates to influence elected and appointed government decision makers. The course will explore the impacts lobbyists and community activists have on decision makers as they consider policy voices. The course will include discussions with elected and appointed government officials well as with professional lobbyists and community advocates. In addition to readings and speakers, the course will include case studies in order illustrate the concepts and provide students with real world examples viewed from multiple perspectives. Students will engage in role-plays in order to prepare and present a strategic plan to win support or oppose a community based project or citywide policy. prerequisite: POLS 101 or UEP 101

301 - Urban Policy and Politics

This seminar focuses on the origin and development of cities, suburbs, and urban areas. It explores the causes, symptoms, and solutions to such urban problems as poverty, housing, transportation, crime and violence, pollution, racial segregation, and neighborhood change. It also examines how power is exercised by different groups,, including business, citizens' groups, community organizations, unions, the media, mayors and other government officials. The course will also examine the role of city planning and planners, conflict and cooperation between cities and suburbs, problems of urban sprawl, loss of open space, water and energy resources. Students will learn about federal urban policy and the role of cities in national politics. The course will also compare American cities with cities in Europe, Canada, and the developing world. Public policies to solve urban problems. Prerequisite: UEP 101 or UEP 106 or POLS 101 or POLS 106 or permission of instructor. Same as UEP 301 
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: US DIVERSITY and UNITED STATES

302 - The American Presidency

This course examines the institution and practices of the American presidency. More specifically, it encourages students to analyze the role and structure of this office, as well as different ideas about presidential power and influence. Particular attention is paid to the presidency and policy making, media coverage, checks and balances, the Constitution, and public opinion. Prerequisite: Politics 101.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

303 - Gender and American Politics

This course examines how gender roles influence social position, political engagement, and allocation of power and resources in American society. Students will investigate why masculinity is often an attribute of those in power, and why "femaleness" correlates with disadvantages in affluence, value in society, and public policies. Students will also determine what changes in the conditions of men's and women's lives might change the gender dynamics of politics.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

Comparative Politics and Area Studies

The following courses are accepted for Politics credit in Comparative Politics and Area Studies subfield: DWA 230, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 240, 310, 332, 333, 338, 340, and History 258.

120 - Introduction to Comparative Politics

Introduction to the major substantive concerns, methods, and purposes of comparative politics, focusing on broad "macro-level" analytical concepts (e.g., modernization and political development, dependency and world system perspectives, revolution and political violence, political culture, and elites) rather than descriptive information about particular political systems. However, a few political systems will be studied and used as cases for methodological discussions.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL AND GLOBAL CONNECTIONS 

218 - Russian Relations With the World

A careful examination of contemporary Russian foreign policy. The focus will be on the complex of foreign policy relationships that have developed in the geographical space and sphere of influence formerly occupied by the Soviet Union. Russia's relations with the United States, with Western Europe, with the Far East and with Central Europe will receive special attention. NATO expansion, arms control, the Balkan conflict, and Russian policy toward the new states of the Caucasus and Central Asia, and Russia's relations with international financial institutions will all be evaluated.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: CENTRAL, SOUTH, AND EAST ASIA

221 - Latin American Politics

This course is an analysis of Latin American politics in the 20th century, with a focus on contemporary democratic politics. The course will discuss the historical, institutional, and social forces that have both accelerated and opposed democratization, and will cover topics of current concern to the region, including economic development, security and the rule of law, the design of political institutions, human rights, and social movements. Prerequisite: Politics 101.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: LATIN AMERICA and REGIONAL FOCUS

223 - Dilemmas of Democracy

Has the “Third Wave” of democratization ended? Will democracy continue to be the model for the future? This course will look at the dramatic increase in the number of democracies worldwide over the last thirty years, and at case studies that illustrate the political and economic factors behind the increasing number of "illiberal," "populist" and semi-authoritarian democracies; the impact of gridlock and corruption in contemporary democratic systems, including the United States; and the challenges democracies are facing in integrating formerly marginalized populations, including women, poor and the indigenous. It will examine the US policy of "democracy promotion," and the implications of these trends for the United States in a globalized world. Prerequisite: DWA 101 or Politics 101.

226 - Contemporary Chinese Politics

This course is an introduction to 20th Century Chinese politics. The course will explore the historical background to the current Chinese situation. Students will also examine the politics of China under Mao and during the subsequent reform period, including the role of China in global politics.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: CENTRAL, SOUTH, AND EAST ASIA and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

227 - East Asian Politics: China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

A comparative analysis of the history, culture, and contemporary politics of the four countries in the dynamic East Asian region: China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. This course will also cover the political economy of the East Asian industrialism.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: CENTRAL, SOUTH, AND EAST ASIA and REGIONAL FOCUS

320 - Advanced Theories of Comparative Politics

Critical examination of the major substantive concerns, methods, and purposes of comparative politics, focusing on broad "macro-level" analytical concepts (e.g., modernization and political development, dependency and world system perspectives, revolution and political violence, political culture, and elites) rather than descriptive information about particular political systems. However, a few political systems will be studied and used as cases for methodological discussions.

321 - Gender and Politics in the Developing World

This course will explore the role of women in politics throughout the globe, with an emphasis on case studies from the developing world. Students will examine the development of policy changes that advance gender equality, paying attention to how the international system, domestic institutions, and social movements play in this process. Students will also study how women attain and wield power in local and national politics. The course will further emphasize how gender politics intersects with other forms of identity politics, including race, ethnicity, and sexuality. The course is grounded in the study of comparative politics, and will draw primarily on examples from Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Prerequisite: Politics 101 or 120 or DWA 101.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

295 - Topics in Politics

Topics in Politics

320 - Advanced Theories of Comparative Politics

Critical examination of the major substantive concerns, methods, and purposes of comparative politics, focusing on broad "macro-level" analytical concepts (e.g., modernization and political development, dependency and world system perspectives, revolution and political violence, political culture, and elites) rather than descriptive information about particular political systems. However, a few political systems will be studied and used as cases for methodological discussions.

International Relations and Foreign Policy

The following courses are accepted for Politics credit in International Relations and Foreign Policy subfield: DWA 101, 201, 231, 241, 337, 342, and 343.

 

130 - Introduction to International Relations

This course is an introduction to the theories and practices of international relations with a focus on the United States and its relations with other state actors. This course will visit all of the important IR theories that help us understand and predict state behavior. These theories will be applied to real-world IR events in order to test their utility.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

232 - International Political Economy

This course is an undergraduate survey of the field of international political economy (IPE). It is intended as an introduction for students who already have some background in the field of international relations and are interested in exploring international economic relations at a deeper level. The course covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The theme to be explored in this course is "National Interest vs. Global Governance?" - that is, we will explore the theory and history of international political economy as an extension of national interest and an arena for the development of global governance, and the question of whether or not these two dimensions of international political economy are compatible or competitive with each other. The first part of the course will cover the basic concepts and theoretical foundations of IPE. The focus is on core theoretical principles and approaches. The goal is to understand how theory is framed and "works," the potential inferences of this theory, and the issues of contention within the field. The second part of the course draws on the theoretical foundations to examine a set of specific international economic issue arenas, including international trade, finance and economic development. SAME AS DWA 220

233 - International Security

This course is an introduction to international security and strategic studies. This field is fundamentally about both the use of force by and violent conflict among states and non-state actors. The course will be guided by general theoretical questions regarding security: How does violent conflict, or competitions shaped by the lurking possibility  of such conflict, affect international relations and individual societies? How has the role of violent conflict in international politics changed since the end of World War II? What is the nature of security today? These general questions will frame explorations of more specific strategic questions. Such questions will include: How do states and non-state actors use force to persuade their enemies to take (coercion) or refrain from taking (deterrence) a particular action? How can nations best prepare to prevent violent conflicts or to win them if they occur? What has determined success and failure, the intensity, duration, and consequences of military action? We will have a particular focus on emerging transnational security issues, intra-state security, and the relationship among security, development and state failure. Pursuing answers to these questions will require an approach that integrates theory, history and current events. Same as DWA 250

235 - United States Foreign Relations

This course focuses on the evolution of U.S. foreign policy in recent Administrations, with special emphasis on the post-Cold War period. Attention is paid to American policy toward "emerging issues," for example, the global environment, development policy in the North/South dialogue, ethnic violence and nationalist civil wars, human rights and humanitarian relief. It explores how policy is formulated and implemented, and analyzes the relationship of foreign policy to American economic and defense policies. It examines U.S. policy toward major regional power configurations-in Europe, the Far East, Latin America, the Middle East, South Asia and Africa. Prerequisite: Politics 101 or DWA 101.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

336 - National Security and Arms Control

This course is an examination of American national security in the post-Communist world. The role of intelligence, military forces, -peace-keeping, and economic assistance in securing U.S. interests in the "new world order." Some emphasis will be placed on the experience of the Cold War, but most of the class will focus on the debates surrounding contemporary security policies. Close attention will be paid to the structures of national security decision-making-the Presidency, Congress, the Department of Defense, the CIA, and the National Security Council. For Politics, UEP and DWA majors only.

Political Theory

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150 - Introduction to Political Theory

This course is an introduction to the study of politics and political theory through prominent Western political theorists, from the Ancient Greeks to the 20th Century. Course themes include theories of human nature, the origins of law and government, the rise and development of different political institutions, and citizen relationships with the state.

251 - European Political Thought: From Plato to Machiavelli

The ideas of justice, obligation, freedom, and the good state in Plato and Aristotle; history and equality in the Old and New Testaments; Roman theories of law and politics; Christianity and the role of the state in St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas; Machiavelli on political power and political regeneration.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: EUROPE and REGIONAL FOCUS and PRE-1800

252 - European Political Thought From Hobbes to Marx

Traditional, aristocratic society as described by Bodin; "self-seeking," the state of nature, obligation, and natural law in Hobbes and Locke; Rousseau on freedom and equality; utilitarianism and liberty in Bentham and Mill; the dialectical method, history, and self-consciousness in Hegel; alienation, historical materialism, and class struggle in Marx. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors only
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: EUROPE and REGIONAL FOCUS and PRE-1800 

253 - European Political Thought From Nietzsche to the Present

Nietzsche on nihilism, power, art, and the creation of value; Durkheim on community and anomie; bureaucracy and authority in Weber; Freud on civilization's discontents; the Marxisms of Lenin and Gramsci; Heidegger's thoughts on Being; the existentialism of Sartre; the feminism of de Beauvoir; Marcuse, Habermas and the Frankfurt School; Foucault and theories of power.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: EUROPE and REGIONAL FOCUS

256 - Ethics and Politics

This course will introduce students to several core analytical approaches in moral and political philosophy, including consequentialism, utilitarianism, distributive justice, freedom, autonomy, and an ethics of care. Students will apply these approaches to case studies in ethical decision-making in politics and policy, and students will weigh arguments in favor or against specific courses of action. As such, this course bridges readings in moral and political philosophy with “real world” problems confronted by policymakers and leaders. In evaluating resolutions to these problems, students will sharpen their critical-thinking and decision-making skills. This is a course in applied ethics, with material drawn both from philosophy and from policy. Prerequisite: Politics 101 or Politics 150

257 - Conservative and Libertarian Political Philosophy

This seminar surveys the historical roots of modern conservative and libertarian political ideas, with particular attention to the persistent tension between tradition and innovation. The purpose of the seminar is to enable students to recognize recurring themes that have shaped political thought and action over several thousand years. Students will be graded on weekly essays and seminar participation.

350 - Plato, Machiavelli, and Hobbes

Each member of this course will undertake a close reading of some works by Plato, Machiavelli, and Hobbes. The seminar will meet one evening a week for an hour and a half in the professor's home on the edge of campus. Prerequisite: one political theory course or one philosophy course.
2 units

351 - Tocqueville, Marx, and Nietzsche

Each member of this course will undertake a close reading of some works by Tocqueville, Marx, and Nietzsche. The seminar will meet one evening a week for an hour and a half in the professor's home on the edge of campus. Open only to Politics majors or by permission of instructor.

352 - Black Political Thought

This course is an intensive exploration of black political thought from a variety of perspectives. Emphasizing conceptual diversity and continuity across time and geography, we will examine a wide range of authors including, but not limited to Angela Davis, W.E.B. DuBois, Frantz Fanon, Marcus Garvey, bell hooks, Martin Luther King, Jr., Glenn Loury, Booker T. Washington, Ida B Wells, Cornell West, and Malcolm X. The range of ideological perspectives under review will include liberalism, conservatism, nationalism, womanism, Marxism and pan Africanism. Prerequisite: Politics 101. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors only. 
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

353 - Seminar: Advanced Study in Political Theory

In this course, we will read closely and discuss the works of Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Tocqueville, Marx, and Nietzsche. Not available to students who have taken Politics 360 or 361 Prerequisite: At least one political theory or philosophy course.
2 units

354 - Seminar on how How Tyrannies Work

This course will look at theories of tyranny offered by Plato, Aristotle, Tacitus, Machiavelli, Tocqueville, Marx, Weber, Freud, Arendt, and Marcuse. The course requires a major research paper in which the student will use one or more of these theories to analyze a modern tyranny of his or her choice. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors only

Applied Politics Courses

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260 - Community Law Internship

The goal of the Community Law Internship is to provide students with an experiential understanding of the practice of public interest law and community lawyering. The Community Law Internship must be taken simultaneously with Politics 241,which establishes the theoretical foundation for the co-requisite courses through the exploration of scholarship in the areas of: progressive legal practice, community collaboration, critical reflection, social justice activism, and community organizing.  The Community Law Internship allows students to learn through direct experience about the practice of public interest law in Los Angeles, as well as examine how social structures and related identity categories such as gender, race, ability, sexual orientation, and class interact on multiple levels to create social inequality. All students enrolled in the Community Law Internship work with a community-based legal organization engaged in public interest law practice a minimum of 12 hours each week.  The unique approach of integrating Politics 240 and Politics 241 takes advantage of Occidental faculty expertise and the wide-range of community-based educational opportunities available in Los Angeles. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Corequisite: Politics 340.

261 - New Orleans Internship

This internship involves students living and working with the Lower Ninth Ward Living Museum and other community organizations in the Lower Ninth Ward for a week over the winter break, spring break, or summer break. Students will also complete coursework on the human causes and consequences of government inaction with Hurricane Katrina as part of this internship experience. Prerequisite: Politics 101. 2 units.

495 - Comprehensive Seminar

Politics majors are required to take Politics 495 in fulfillment of their senior comprehensive obligation. They, therefore, should have met, or be in the process of meeting, all requirements for the major. The Seminar meets in the spring semester, but students will be expected to submit proposals for their research papers in the fall semester prior to the actual meeting of the Seminar. The Seminar itself will engage all students in an analytical review of a wide range of materials from various aspects of the discipline and will require that students write a major research paper in one particular sub-discipline of the field. Students qualifying for College Honors will be given an opportunity to write research papers that will be evaluated by the department for honors.

270, 271 and 272 - Campaign Semester

Campaign Semester provides Occidental College students with an opportunity to learn about political campaigns and elections through first-hand experience.  Students receive a full semester of college credit (16 units) while volunteering full-time in a Presidential, U.S. Senate, U.S. House, or gubernatorial campaign. The program is offered during Presidential and Mid-term elections (i.e., Fall 2014 and Fall 2016). Students can volunteer for a Republican or Democratic campaign, or a "minor" party if the campaign is set up to adequately supervise volunteers. The program is open to all Oxy students, regardless of major. Students who participate in Campaign Semester take the following three courses (Politics 270, 271, 272) simultaneously.

Politics 270 - Students will participate in the daily activities of a campaign for United States President or United States Senate in a key "battleground" state. Students will gain experience in the highest level of politics and gain an understanding of how a national presidential campaign or a statewide United States Senate campaign is operated. Students will learn about political strategy, voter contact and turnout, messaging and polling, communications, volunteer recruitment and team-building, fundraising, and other key aspects of campaigns. The internship will involve working full-time (a minimum of 40 hours a week) from the first day of class until Election Day. Following that ten-week campaign fieldwork internship, students will return to campus and participate in two seminars as part of Campaign Semester. Campaigns involve long, hard days. The staff that students will work with will typically be working at least 14-16 hour days. Although students are required to work at least 8 hours a day, they are likely to work more. As part of the Campaign Fieldwork Internship, students will be required to read three books-biographies of each major party candidate and a book describing previous presidential campaigns. Students will be required to maintain an internship journal that will be handed in at the end of the 10-week internship. The journal will describe their activities (including the projects they work on, campaign meetings and events, relationship of the campaign to the media, and to constitutuency groups), the internal dynamics and work of the campaign, the different roles and tasks of staff and volunteers in the campaigns, the way the media reports on the campaign, the students' reflections on these matters, and, at the end, a summary of the campaign outcome. Students will be required to email the supervising Occidental faculty member at least once a week about their activities and reflections. The students will be supervised in the field by a campaign staff member. Students will participate, through teleconferencing, in a two-hour course meeting with other students and faculty three times during the semester. Students, who will be working in different parts of the country, will stay in touch with each other, as well as with the faculty, through Moodle, a web-based course management system. The system allows faculty members to post readings, facilitate discussions, give and receive assignments, etc. Students in various parts of the country will thus form a virtual classroom and on-line learning community. Some students may wish to document their experiences on the campaign trail, observe events, and interview staff and volunteers, by making videos. If so, these should be posted to the faculty and other students via the internet. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Campaign Semester Program.
8 units
 
Politics 271 -  Seminar on Political Campaigns
In this course, which will take place during the last five weeks of the semester, students explore theoretical and applied concepts pertaining to United States political campaigns. Students will examine the role of money, media, candidates, interest groups, leadership, gender, race, and political parties in terms of who wins and loses elections. Learning will take place through assigned readings, professor lectures, guest lectures from campaign  experts and candidates, and peer dialogues. Student learning will be assessed by their contribution   to the classroom experience (discussion, dialogue), discussion of assigned readings, and examinations.   Enrollment limited to students participating in the Campaign Semester Program. 4 units.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

Politics 272 - Independent Study on Political Campaigns
This course entails production of a 25-page research essay addressing a major question pertaining to campaigns in American politics. Each student will work with a professor to craft a high-quality research paper that enters the academic debate on their selected topic, incorporates extensive secondary data and existing research, and presents original analysis based on the student's campaign fieldwork. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Campaign Semester Program. Satisfies Junior Writing Requirement.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

280-286 - Washington Internship

Washington Internship provides Occidental College students with an opportunity to learn about D.C. politics and policy making through first-hand experience through the Washington Internship Institute. Students receive a full semester of college credit (16 units) while volunteering full-time for a branch of government, a policy non-profit, or a media organization that covers politics. Students who participate in Campaign Semester take the following three courses (Politics 280 and 281, and either 282, 283, 284, 285, or 286) simultaneously.

280 - Washington, D.C. Internship
Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. will work four full days per week in an internship in a political office, non-profit corporation, or for-profit company engaged in political or policy work. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. Course fulfills upper-division American Politics credits for the major. Prerequisite: Politics 101. 8 units.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

281 - Seminar in Political Leadership
Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to take a political leadership seminar that explores how active, global citizenship can advance career goals. This course develops leadership skills through the themes of public speaking, professional writing, networking, interviewing, and giving and receiving feedback. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. Course fulfills upper-division American Politics requirements for the major. Prerequisite: Politics 101.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

282 - Seminar in Washington Politics: Environmental Law and Policy Studies
Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on environmental law and public policy. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. Course fulfills upper-division American Politics requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Politics 101. Corequisites: Politics 280 and Politics 281.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

283 - Seminar in Washington Politics: Global Public Health Policy
Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on public health policy in a global context. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. Course fulfills Comparative Politics requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Politics 101. Corequisites: Politics 280 and Politics 281.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

284 - Seminar in Washington Politics: Global Women’s Leadership Development
Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on women’s leadership in a global context. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. Course fulfills Comparative Politics requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Politics 101. Corequisites: Politics 280 and Politics 281.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

285 - Seminar in Washington Politics: Inside Washington Politics and Policies
Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on politics and public policy in the Washington, D.C. context. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. Course fulfills upper-division American Politics requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Politics 101. Corequisites: Politics 280 and Politics 281.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

286 - Seminar in Washington Politics: International and Foreign Policy Studies
Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on international relations. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. Course fulfills International Relations requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Politics 101. Corequisites: Politics 280 and Politics 281.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Public Law

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140 - Law and Society

Lawyers who advocate for a more equal, sustainable and participatory society are practicing in a new context today. These lawyers use different techniques and play different roles than those of the litigation impact lawyers of the 1960s or 1970s. In this course students will explore the role of law in the context of social change across the political spectrum. Students will be introduced to central role of law in social processes as they critically examine  cultural, economic, political, and social aspects of law and legal systems. Topics in the course may include: competing definitions of social change lawyering and the relevance of such definitions; critical legal studies; historical perspectives of American law and its role in hindering or furthering social change; human rights; transnational advocacy; comparative cases studies of rights claiming; and progressive/conservative ideologies in social change lawyering.  
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

244 - Constitutional Law I

This course provides an introduction to constitutional law and constitutional theory, examining the ways in which the Constitution distributes power among the branches government in the American political system, and limits the exercise of those powers. The course will also consider the role of the judiciary in creating legal and political boundaries for society. Throughout the semester, this course will focus not only on legal doctrine, but also on the broader intellectual and political context in which it evolves. Using constitutional law cases and moot courts, the course will explore the role of the United States Supreme Court as a civil liberties policymaker, and the process through which decisions are reached. Prerequisite: Politics 101 or instructor permission. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors only.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

247 - Supreme Court Politics

This course engages students in critical examination current term United States Supreme Court cases.   The course places questions of doctrine and theory in historic, social and political contexts.  Student are required to co-lead class sessions and have the option, with permission of instructor, of selecting readings the mode of analysis for the session. In addition to co-leading a class session, students are required to write a series of short analytic papers of the cases discussed and a final research paper. Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors only.
2 units

340 - Rebellious Lawyering

Pursuing effective change, particularly in today's complex world, requires creative collaborative efforts to identify and implement solutions to achieve a more radically participatory democracy. Rebellious Lawyering considers the related theories of legal scholars who have reconceptualized legal practice to transform systems through both legal and community knowledge. This scholarship has been defined as rebellious lawyering, third-dimensional lawyering, collaborative lawyering, democratic lawyering, and community lawyering. All of these theories impart a common vision of lawyering for social change in stark contrast to the traditional or regnant model. The praxis of Rebellious Lawyering (Politics 340) and Community Law Internship (Politics 260) creates a balanced context from which students develop critical consciousness, question assumptions of power, privilege, and identity, learn to respect community decision-making capacities, expand their understanding of the importance of relationships in the pursuit of social change, and remain open to learning from the “lived-experiences” of the community. The unique co-requisite course design allows students to engage in a weekly seminar (Politics 340), work as law clerks in community-based public interest legal service organizations (Politics 260), and interact with Los Angeles activists and lawyers as part of a speaker series. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. 
Corequisite: Politics 260.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

345 - The Fourth Amendment

This course examines constitutional criminal procedure through an analysis of Fourth Amendment constitutional restraints on activities during the investigatory stage of the criminal process. Exploring Supreme Court decisions through doctrinal analysis and simulations, the course questions the Supreme Court as a policymaker seeking to balance privacy rights with governmental intrusions. Prerequisite: Politics 244 or instructor permission of instructor. Closed to first year students
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

346 - Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

This course is a critical analysis of civil liberties and civil rights in the United States. The course will consider topics such as privacy, marriage, speech, capital punishment, reproductive autonomy, voting, property, and freedom of expression. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding how the law has deemed certain rights and liberties as fundamental to society. Throughout the course students will consider the role of the law in creating political boundaries within society. The course challenges students to understand the changing nature of constitutional rights and constitutional meaning in American history. In particular, this course approaches Supreme Court decisions as reflections of a larger social narrative of rights and justice. Prerequisite: Politics 244 or instructor permission of instructor. .
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES and US DIVERSITY

347 - Race and Law

Understanding how the law has defined race is of critical significance to the study of politics and the experience and history of race and race relations in America. The course examines definitions of race within legal precedent and how the law has created racial identities. The course considers the relationship between race and law in many different manifestations from the colonial period to the present day to understand theses complex intersections. Prerequisite: POLS 244 or instructor permission.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES

Applied Learning Experiences for Politics

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212 - Mobilizing Voters: Ethnographic Field Research

This community-based learning course introduces advanced undergraduates (sophomores, juniors, and seniors) to the study of voter mobilization via an ethnographic research project in Los Angeles. As part of the Fall congressional elections, students will partner with community organizations in Los Angeles that are developing non-partisan Get Out the Vote (GOTV) initiatives. These organizations are based primarily in Latino/a and Asian-American communities. Students will study and evaluate these GOTV initiatives with the goal of analyzing, assessing, and reporting back on best practices in GOTV initiatives, especially in ethnic minority communities. Course time will be divided between the classroom and the field. Students will receive training in, and learn to critically evaluate, field research methods—especially in the area of qualitative, ethnographic research (interviews and observations). Students will also learn about the strategies, practices, and pitfalls of voter mobilization practices in urban communities. Offered Fall semester in even-years to coincide with the national elections. [Note, for Fall 2014 the organizations are: SCOPE (Strategic Concepts in Organizing Policy & Education), Community Coalition/El Movimiento, Rock the Vote/CalPirg, and Advancing Justice Los Angeles.] Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with permission of the instructor only.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL and US DIVERSITY

280 - Washington, D.C. Internship

Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. will work four full days per week in an internship in a political office, non-profit corporation, or for-profit company engaged in political or policy work. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. 8 credits. Course fulfills upper-division American Politics credits for the major. Prerequisite: POLS 101
 

281 - Seminar in Political Leadership

Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to take a political leadership seminar that explores how active, global citizenship can advance career goals. This course develops leadership skills through the themes of public speaking, professional writing, networking, interviewing, and giving and receiving feedback. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. 4 credits. Course fulfills upper-division American Politics requirements for the major. Prerequisite: POLS 281
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: US DIVERSITY and UNITED STATES

282 - Seminar in Washington Politics: Environmental Law and Policy Studies

Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on environmental law and public policy. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. 4 credits. Course fulfills upper-division American Politics requirement for the major. Prerequisite: POLS 101.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: US DIVERSITY and UNITED STATES

283 - Seminar in Washington Politics: Global Public Health Policy

Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on public health policy in a global context. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. 4 credits. Course fulfills Comparative Politics requirement for the major. Prerequisite: POLS 101. Co-requisite: POLS 280 and POLS 281
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: GLOBAL CONNECTIONS and INTERCUTLURAL

284 - Seminar in Washington Politics: Global Women’s Leadership Development

Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on women’s leadership in a global context. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. 4 credits. Course fulfills Comparative Politics requirement for the major. Prerequisite: POLS 101. Co-requisite: POLS 280 and POLS 281
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: GLOBAL CONNECTIONS and INTERCULTURAL

285 - Seminar in Washington Politics: Inside Washington

Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on politics and public policy in the Washington, D.C. context. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. 4 credits. Course fulfills upper-division American Politics requirement for the major. Prerequisite: POLS 101. Co-requisite: POLS 280 and POLS 281
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: US DIVERSITY and UNITED STATES

286 - Seminar in Washington Politics: International and Foreign Policy Studies

Students enrolled in the Washington Internship Institute in D.C. are required to enroll in one of five courses on policy-making (282, 283, 284, 285, or 286). This course focuses on international relations. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Washington Internship Institute Program. 4 credits. Course fulfills International Relations requirement for the major. Prerequisite: POLS 101. Co-requisite: POLS 280 and POLS 281
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: GLOBAL CONNECTIONS and INTERCULTURAL

  • Email: politics@oxy.edu
  • Phone: (323) 259-2947
  • Location: Johnson Hall Politics suite: J317 Administrative support: J101A