Faculty

Richard Mora

Associate Professor, Sociology; Affiliated Faculty, Latino/a & Latin American Studies

Dr. Mora teaches courses on youth cultures, education, immigration, & social inequality

Contact

  • Office: Swan Hall 214
  • Email: rmora@oxy.edu
  • Phone: (323) 259-2871
  • :

Department Chair, Sociology

Education: B.A., Harvard College (Sociology); M.A., University of Michigan (Education); M.A., Harvard University (Sociology); Ph.D., Harvard University (Sociology & Social Policy)

Courses | Publications | Presentations

Dr. Mora has taught at Oxy since 2006. His current research projects focus on gender, education, youth cultures, and juvenile justice.

Courses

Fall 2012

CSP 1  (Im)migrant Communities of California
Team-Taught–Mary Christianakis, Ph.D.; Salvador Fernández, Ph.D.; and Richard Mora, Ph.D.
This course offers students the opportunity to analyze the sociohistoric, legal, and cultural tensions surrounding various (im)migrant communities in California. Students will explore the various waves of (im)migration across time to understand the diverse communities of California. Students will also build critical and interpretive capacities through the examination of state policies, statistics, and various historical and empirical studies. Additionally, through the construction and revision of several expository, research-based writings on immigration, students will hone their writing, argumentation, and presentation skills.

Sociology 105 Immigrant Youth and Youth Cultures
Part of the first-year California Immigration Semester (CIS), this course examines the role of youth cultures in the identity formation of immigrant adolescent youth residing in the Southwest region of the United States. Particular attention is paid to: (1) theories of acculturation and assimilation used to analyze the experiences of immigrant youth; (2) the impact of geographical location, social class, gender, race, sexuality, popular culture, mass media, and technology; and (3) the intersection of youth cultures, home cultures, and mainstream society.

Spring 2013

Sociology 255 Youth Cultures in U.S. Society
This course examines the role of youth cultures in the identity formation of adolescents residing throughout the United States. Particular attention is paid to (1) the impact of geographical location, social class, gender, race, sexuality, popular culture, mass media, and technology; (2) the intersection of youth cultures and mainstream society; and (3) the contention that some youth cultures are “deviant”.
Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and 200 or 205.

Sociology 315 Sociology of Education
This course uses different sociological perspectives to examine social aspects of schooling and educational institutions in the U.S. Specifically, the course focuses on factors that may impede and/or facilitate learning such as social class, gender, race and ethnicity, teacher and parental expectations, and peers. Additionally, the role of education in the acculturation and assimilation process is considered, as are the ways in which schools ameliorate and/or replicate social inequalities.
Prerequisites: Sociology 101 and 200 or 205.

Publications

Articles (Double-Blind Peer Reviewed)

Mora, R. 2013. "Dicks are for chicks": Latino Boys, Masculinity, and the Abjection of Homosexuality. Gender and Education.

Mora, R. & Christianakis, M. 2012. Feeding the School-to-Prison Pipeline: The Convergence of Neoliberalism, Conservatism, and Penal Populism. Journal of Educational Controversy 7(1).

Mora, R. 2012. “Do it for all your pubic hairs!”: Latino Boys, Masculinity, and Puberty. Gender and Society 26(3): 433-460.

Mora, R. 2011. “School is so boring”: High-Stakes Testing and Boredom at an Urban Middle School. Perspectives on Urban Education 9(1).

Mora, R. & Christianakis, M. 2011. Charter Schools, Market Capitalism, and Obama’s Neoliberal Agenda. Journal of Inquiry and Action in Education 4(1): 93-111.

Mora, R. 2011. Abjection and the Cinematic Cholo: The Chicano Gang Stereotype in Sociohistoric Context. THYMOS: Journal of Boyhood Studies 5(2): 124-137.

Book Chapters (Open Peer Reviewed)

Christianakis, M. & Mora, R. (Forthcoming). California’s (not so) Public Schools: Local & Private Subsidies in Public Education. The Poor Are Not The Problem: Insisting on Class Equity in Schools, P.C. Gorski & J. Landsman (Eds.). Stylus Press.

Mora, R., Christianakis, M., & Fernandez, S. (In Press). College Curriculum as Counter Discourse: The California Immigration Semester at Occidental College. In E. Daniels and B. Porfilio (Eds.), Dangerous Counter-stories in the Corporate Academy: Narrating for Understanding, Solidarity, Resistance, and Community in the Age of Neoliberalism.

Christianakis, M. & Mora, R. (In Press). Urban Latino Parents’ Narratives of Parent Involvement. The Education of the Hispanic Population, Volume 2. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Christianakis, M. & Mora, R. (In Press). E pluribus unum: Elementary School Narratives and the Making of National Identity.  In H. Hickman and B.J. Porfilio (Eds.), The New Politics of the Textbook: Challenging the Curricular Dominance of Textbooks, pp. 107-126. Sense Publishers.

Mora, R. & Christianakis, M. 2012. “No Free Rides, No Excuses”: Film Stereotypes of Urban Working Class Students. In M.K. Booker (Ed.), Blue Collar Pop Culture in Film, pp. 167-180. Santa Barbara, California: Praeger Press.

Christianakis, M. & Mora, R. 2012. A Critical Analysis of Social Hierarchies in Children’s Television. In M.K. Booker (Ed.), Blue Collar Pop Culture in Television, pp. 210-223. Santa Barbara, California: Praeger Press.

Mora, R. 2011. Life, Death, and Second Mothering: Mexican American Mothers, Gang Violence, and La Virgen de Guadalupe.” In D.S. Silva (Ed.), Chicana/Latina Mothering, pp. 71-86. Demeter Press.

Christianakis, M. & Mora R. 2011. Charting a New Course for Public Education through Charter Schools: Where is Obama Taking Us? In P.R. Carr & B.J. Porfilio (eds.), The Phenomenon of Obama and the Agenda for Education: Can Hope Audaciously Trump Neoliberalism?, pp. 97-119. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Invited Works (Non-Peer Reviewed)

Mora, R. 2012. The Cinematic Cholo in Havoc. iMex, 2: 66-72.

Mora , R. 2003. Tijuana: Un Refugio de Mundos. (Cityscapes: Latin America and beyond). ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America, 2(2): 70-73.

Mora, R. 2002. Living History in Zapopan. (Democracy in Latin America: Looking back, thinking ahead). ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America, 2(1): 46.

Zavala, S. and Mora, R. 2001.  I Am: The Voice of Graffiti. (Many Voices, Many Visions). ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America, pp. 43-44.   [Republished in The Change Agent (Adult Education for Social Justice: News, Issues & Ideas), Issue 15, p. 8. New England Literacy Resource Center].

Mora, R. 2000. What Should Be on Everyone’s Agenda: Honoring Humanity. (Looking Into the Future, Preserving the Past). ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America , pp. 43-44.

Encyclopedia Entries

Mora, R. (In Press). Zoot Suit Riots. In A. Kindell and E. Demers (Eds.), Encyclopedia of American Populism. ABC-CLIO Publishing.

Mora, R. 2012. José Ángel Gutiérrez Martínez. In R.K.Rasmussen (Ed.), Great Lives from History: Latinos, pp. 416-417. Pasadena, CA: Salem Press.

Mora, R. 2011. Conflict Resolution/Peer Mediation. In L. Finley (Ed.), Encyclopedia of School Crime and Violence, pp. 101-104. ABC-CLIO Publishing.

Mora, R. 2011. Monitor the Future Survey. In L. Finley (Ed.), Encyclopedia of School Crime and Violence, pp. 291-292. ABC-CLIO Publishing.

Mora, R. 2011. Joaquín Murrieta. In K. Arnold (Ed.), Anti-Immigration in the United States: An Encyclopedia, pp. 349-351. ABC-CLIO Publishing.

Mora, R. 2011. Model Minority. In K. Arnold (Ed.), Anti-Immigration in the United States: A Encyclopedia, pp. 344-345. ABC-CLIO Publishing.

Book Reviews

Mora, R. 2010. Review of The Woman in the Zoot Suit: Gender, Nationalism, and the Cultural Politics of Memory by Catherine S. Ramírez. Latino Studies, 8: 428-430.

Mora, R. 2010. Review of Erotic Journeys: Mexican Immigrants and their Sex Lives by Gloria González-López. Journal of Men’s Studies 18(1): 111-112.

Mora, R. 2009. Review of Being Normal Is The Only Way To Be by Wayne Martino and Maria Pallotta-Chiarolli. Journal of Men’s Studies 17(3): 259-260.

Mora, R. 2009. Review of Voices of African-American Teen Fathers: “I’m Doing What I Got to Do” by Angelia M. Paschal. Journal of Men’s Studies 17(3): 262-264.

Mora, R. 2009. Review of Dying to be Men: Youth, Masculinity, and Social Exclusion by Gary T. Barker. Journal of Men’s Studies 17(3): 264-266.

Mora, R. 2004. Learning to Walk in Someone Else’s Shoes: Review of The Promotion of Social Awareness: Powerful Lessons from the Partnership of Developmental Theory by Robert L. Selman. ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America 3(2): 57.

Essays, Commentaries, & Opinion-Editorials

Mora, R. (In Press). My Tijuana Lost. In S. Cortez and S. Troncoso (Eds.), The Lost Border: How Life and Culture has been Changed by Violence Along U.S.-Mexico Border. Arte Público Press.

Rocha, M., Zavala, S., & Mora, R. 2007. Know What I’m Saying?’: Getting to the Root of Interracial Gang Violence.” The Undercurrent: Fresno's Paper for Arts, Entertainment, News & Political Analysis," 2(5): 7.

Mora, Richard. June 16, 2006. ¡Inmigrantes Sí, Boicots No! LA Opinión, Tribuna Pública.

Mora, Richard. April 2, 2006. Al Megamovimiento. LA Opinión, Tribuna Pública.

Mora, R. 2003. When you don’t own Your own home.” The Change Agent (Adult Education for Social Justice: News, Issues & Ideas), 17: 19. New England Literacy Resource Center.

Mora, R. 2003. Learning About words at Harvard. The Change Agent (Adult Education for Social Justice: News, Issues & Ideas), 16: 7. New England Literacy Resource Center.

Presentations

Conference Presentations

Christianakis, M. and Mora, R. 2011. (Re)Writing Identities: Past, Present, and Future Narratives of Youth in Juvenile Detention Facilities. Multiple Childhoods / Multidisciplinary Perspectives: Interrogating Normativity in Childhood Studies. Rutgers University, Camden, NJ. May 19 – 21 2011.

Mora, R. and M., Christianakis, M. 2011. Teen Motherhood: Controlling Images, Abjection, & Performativity. Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Seattle, WA. March 2011.

Mora, Richard. 2010. “Do it for all your public hairs!”: Latino Boys, Masculinity, and Puberty. Sociology of Children and Youth. Annual Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Oakland, CA. April 8 – April 11 2010.

Mora, R. 2007. Your Word is Your Currency: Conducting Ethical Ethnographic Research. Annual Pacific Sociological Association Meeting, Oakland, CA. March 29 – April 1 2007.

Mora, R. 2006. Latino Boys, Masculinity, and Puberty. American Men’s Studies Association, XIV. Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, April 7-9, 2006.

Mora, R. 2003. ‘Hey, What’s Going On in There?’: An Ethnography of Classroom Dynamics in an Urban Middle School. Education Across the Americas Conference.  Teachers College, Columbia University. April 10-11, 2003.

Mora, R. 2001. Smile Now, Cry Later: Mothers of Victims of Gang-Related Violence Speak Out. Globalizing the Streets: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Youth, Social Control and Empowerment in the New Millennium Conference. John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. May 2-5, 2001.

Invited Lectures & Presentations

Mora, R. 2012, April 5th. On Ideas, Life, and Death. Last Lecture Series. Occidental College. Los Angeles, CA.

Christianakis, M. and Mora, R. 2012. Diversity Day: Immigration. Polytechnic High School. Pasadena, CA.

Christianakis, M. and Mora, R. 2012. Children, Development, and the Textual Gun Dilemma. Art Center College of Design. Pasadena, CA.

Mora, R. 2009, May. Invited Lecturer. Teaching Education Program (TEP) Seminar, UCLA. Los Angeles, CA.

Mora, R. 2008, June. Invited Lecturer. Teaching Education Program (TEP) Seminar, UCLA. Los Angeles, CA.

Mora, R. 2008, May. Invited Lecturer. Teaching Education Program (TEP) Seminar, UCLA.

Mora, R. 2008, January. Keynote Speaker. Males to Men (M2M) Graduation Ceremony. Kauffman Scholars, Inc. Kansas City, MI.

Mora, R. 2007, December. Guest Speaker. Males to Men (M2M) Workshop. Kauffman Scholars, Inc. Kansas City, MI.