"Combatting Anti-Asian/Anti-AAPI Hate Crimes & Violence" — CTSJ's The Matrix —  A Panel Discussion

CTSJ - Los Angeles the Matrix presents an event co-sponsored with the generous support of Oxy's DEB, ICC, SLICE & CCBL

Part of the Matrix: Fighting White Supremacy and Global Ethno-Nationalism Series


Apr15
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
2021-04-15 12:00:00 2021-04-15 13:00:00 "Combatting Anti-Asian/Anti-AAPI Hate Crimes & Violence" — CTSJ's The Matrix —  A Panel Discussion
 
Panelist bios:
Jenn Fang is founder, editor, and  primary blogger of Reappropriate.co. Created in 2001, Reappropriate is one of the web’s oldest and most popular Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) race advocacy and feminism blogs. The blog’s writing focuses on race, gender, identity, Asian American history, and current events. Recent topics include affirmative action, mental health, and criminal justice. As an undergraduate student at Cornell University, Jenn served in several on-campus organizations devoted to Asian American advocacy, including as president of Asian Pacific Americans for Action. In 2003, Jenn graduated from Cornell with a minor in Asian American Studies.  She earned her Ph.D. in 2010.In addition to maintaining Reappropriate, Jenn’s writing has also been featured in: Prism, NBC News, Teen Vogue, Washington Post, Quartz, BlogHer, Good Men Project, Asian Pacific Americans for Progress, Asian Americans for Obama, Angry Asian Man, Northwest Asian Weekly, Blog for Arizona and The Nerds of Color. She also appears monthly as a guest co-host for the Model Majority Podcast, which examines national politics through an Asian American lens. She can also be found on Twitter (@reappropriate) and Facebook (facebook.com/reappropriate.co). For a detailed list of her appearances and guest writing, please visit: http://reappropriate.co/booking-appearances/
 
Prof. Jane Hong: Jane Hong is an associate professor of history at Occidental and the author of Opening the Gates to Asia: A Transpacific History of How America Repealed Asian Exclusion (UNC Press, 2019). She received her PhD in history from Harvard. Hong is currently writing a book about how post-1965 Asian immigration has changed U.S. evangelical institutions and politics.
 
Kristina Wong: Kristina Wong was featured in the New York Times’ Off Color series “highlighting artists of color who use humor to make smart social statements about the sometimes subtle, sometimes obvious ways that race plays out in America today.” She is a performance artist, comedian, writer and elected representative who has been presented internationally across North America, the UK, Hong Kong and Africa.  She’s been a guest on late night shows on Comedy Central and FX, and an actor on film and TV. She starred in her own pilot presentation with Lionsgate for truTV. Her commentaries have appeared on American Public Media’s Marketplace, PBS, VICE, Jezebel, Playgirl Magazine, Huffington Post and CNN. She’s been awarded artist residencies from the MacDowell Colony, New York Theater Workshop, the San Diego International Airport and Ojai Playwrights Festival. Her work has been awarded with grants from Creative Capital, The MAP Fund, Center for Cultural Innovation, National Performance Network, a COLA Master Artist Fellowship from the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, eight Los Angeles Artist-in-Residence awards, and Center Theatre Group’s 2019 Sherwood Award. She’s created viral web series like How Not to Pick Up Asian Chicks and just launched the second season of the award winning Radical Cram School.  Her rap career in post-conflict Northern Uganda is the subject of her last solo theater show The Wong Street Journal which toured the US, Canada and Lagos, Nigeria (presented by the US Consulate).  Her long running show Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest looked at the high rates of depression and suicide among Asian American women and is now a concert film.  Her newest performance project is “Kristina Wong for Public Office”– a simultaneous real life stint as the elected representative of Wilshire Center Koreatown Sub-district 5 Neighborhood Council and rally campaign show.  That show’s national tour was sidelined by the pandemic and has pivoted to streaming performances.Kristina’s current pandemic project is the Auntie Sewing Squad, a national network of volunteers sewing masks for vulnerable communities.  The experience of erecting this remote factory in ten days at the start of the pandemic is the subject of Kristina’s current performance “Kristina Wong, Sweatshop Overlord” which she is developing as a New York Theater Workshop Artistic Instigator.
 
Dr. Yanyan Zhou  Recently defended her dissertation in Mass Communication at the Media School, Indiana Unversity Bloomington.  Her research specifically focuses on digital media effects related to racial and gender stereotypes, dehumanization, and aggression. The results of her studies explain how media effects reify societal inequalities by reinforcing social stereotypes towards minorities, but also aim to reduce sexual objectification, control sexual aggression, and contest gender/sexual orientation-based inequality. Her studies frequently test critical theories using quantitative methods. In addition to working as a researcher, Zhou has also taught a variety of media courses. 
Virtual - Please register to receive Zoom link
America/Los_Angeles public
Location:
Virtual - Please register to receive Zoom link
Event Date: Thursday, April 15, 2021
 
Panelist bios:
Jenn Fang is founder, editor, and  primary blogger of Reappropriate.co. Created in 2001, Reappropriate is one of the web’s oldest and most popular Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) race advocacy and feminism blogs. The blog’s writing focuses on race, gender, identity, Asian American history, and current events. Recent topics include affirmative action, mental health, and criminal justice. As an undergraduate student at Cornell University, Jenn served in several on-campus organizations devoted to Asian American advocacy, including as president of Asian Pacific Americans for Action. In 2003, Jenn graduated from Cornell with a minor in Asian American Studies.  She earned her Ph.D. in 2010.In addition to maintaining Reappropriate, Jenn’s writing has also been featured in: Prism, NBC News, Teen Vogue, Washington Post, Quartz, BlogHer, Good Men Project, Asian Pacific Americans for Progress, Asian Americans for Obama, Angry Asian Man, Northwest Asian Weekly, Blog for Arizona and The Nerds of Color. She also appears monthly as a guest co-host for the Model Majority Podcast, which examines national politics through an Asian American lens. She can also be found on Twitter (@reappropriate) and Facebook (facebook.com/reappropriate.co). For a detailed list of her appearances and guest writing, please visit: http://reappropriate.co/booking-appearances/
 
Prof. Jane Hong: Jane Hong is an associate professor of history at Occidental and the author of Opening the Gates to Asia: A Transpacific History of How America Repealed Asian Exclusion (UNC Press, 2019). She received her PhD in history from Harvard. Hong is currently writing a book about how post-1965 Asian immigration has changed U.S. evangelical institutions and politics.
 
Kristina Wong: Kristina Wong was featured in the New York Times’ Off Color series “highlighting artists of color who use humor to make smart social statements about the sometimes subtle, sometimes obvious ways that race plays out in America today.” She is a performance artist, comedian, writer and elected representative who has been presented internationally across North America, the UK, Hong Kong and Africa.  She’s been a guest on late night shows on Comedy Central and FX, and an actor on film and TV. She starred in her own pilot presentation with Lionsgate for truTV. Her commentaries have appeared on American Public Media’s Marketplace, PBS, VICE, Jezebel, Playgirl Magazine, Huffington Post and CNN. She’s been awarded artist residencies from the MacDowell Colony, New York Theater Workshop, the San Diego International Airport and Ojai Playwrights Festival. Her work has been awarded with grants from Creative Capital, The MAP Fund, Center for Cultural Innovation, National Performance Network, a COLA Master Artist Fellowship from the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, eight Los Angeles Artist-in-Residence awards, and Center Theatre Group’s 2019 Sherwood Award. She’s created viral web series like How Not to Pick Up Asian Chicks and just launched the second season of the award winning Radical Cram School.  Her rap career in post-conflict Northern Uganda is the subject of her last solo theater show The Wong Street Journal which toured the US, Canada and Lagos, Nigeria (presented by the US Consulate).  Her long running show Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest looked at the high rates of depression and suicide among Asian American women and is now a concert film.  Her newest performance project is “Kristina Wong for Public Office”– a simultaneous real life stint as the elected representative of Wilshire Center Koreatown Sub-district 5 Neighborhood Council and rally campaign show.  That show’s national tour was sidelined by the pandemic and has pivoted to streaming performances.Kristina’s current pandemic project is the Auntie Sewing Squad, a national network of volunteers sewing masks for vulnerable communities.  The experience of erecting this remote factory in ten days at the start of the pandemic is the subject of Kristina’s current performance “Kristina Wong, Sweatshop Overlord” which she is developing as a New York Theater Workshop Artistic Instigator.
 
Dr. Yanyan Zhou  Recently defended her dissertation in Mass Communication at the Media School, Indiana Unversity Bloomington.  Her research specifically focuses on digital media effects related to racial and gender stereotypes, dehumanization, and aggression. The results of her studies explain how media effects reify societal inequalities by reinforcing social stereotypes towards minorities, but also aim to reduce sexual objectification, control sexual aggression, and contest gender/sexual orientation-based inequality. Her studies frequently test critical theories using quantitative methods. In addition to working as a researcher, Zhou has also taught a variety of media courses. 
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