Asian American Survival and Solidarity in LA

Nora Fujita-Yuhas, Politics '21 and Nathan Tam, UEP '23 share findings from their research on Asian American community, organizing, and solidarity past and present.  Come hear about the role of LA’s Chinatown as a site of resistance and resilience and Asian American and South Asian solidarity with Black social movements and communities. 


Oct6
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
2022-10-06 18:00:00 2022-10-06 19:30:00 Asian American Survival and Solidarity in LA

Join us for a panel discussion with Nora Fujita-Yuhas, Politics '21, and Nathan Tam, UEP '23, who will share findings from their research on Asian American community, organizing, and solidarity past and present. Come hear about the role of LA’s Chinatown as a site of resistance and resilience and Asian American and South Asian solidarity with Black social movements and communities. The discussion will be moderated by Professor Martha Matsuoka, Urban & Environmental Policy Department and Interim Director, Center for Community Based Learning. 

Nora Fujita-Yuhas (she/her) ‘21 works as the community youth organizer at Center for the Pacific Asian Family in Los Angeles. She supports young Asian and Pacific Islander leaders in building skills around violence prevention, healthy relationships, and community organizing. She also serves on the steering committee of Vigilant Love, a Muslim and Japanese-American arts and activism organization dedicated to fighting Islamophobia and building solidarity. Her thesis at Oxy explored the relationship between Asian American and South Asian political consciousness and conceptualizations of solidarity with Black American communities.
 
Nathan Tam ‘23 (he/him) is UEP major from San Francisco interested in untold stories, learning family histories, and building community solidarity and support at an individual and at a collective level. His research focuses on the history and place-making of Chinese America and the factors that facilitate or detract (or potentially a combo of both) from the social bonding of “community”. His current thesis research builds upon this in discovering sites of community in urban Chinatowns throughout Chinese American history and illuminating younger Asian Americans’ relationship to traditional and unconventional sites of community building in the development of their racial identity. 

Image Credit: Oxy Weekly/Julia Koh

America/Los_Angeles public
Event Date: Thursday, October 6, 2022

Join us for a panel discussion with Nora Fujita-Yuhas, Politics '21, and Nathan Tam, UEP '23, who will share findings from their research on Asian American community, organizing, and solidarity past and present. Come hear about the role of LA’s Chinatown as a site of resistance and resilience and Asian American and South Asian solidarity with Black social movements and communities. The discussion will be moderated by Professor Martha Matsuoka, Urban & Environmental Policy Department and Interim Director, Center for Community Based Learning. 

Nora Fujita-Yuhas (she/her) ‘21 works as the community youth organizer at Center for the Pacific Asian Family in Los Angeles. She supports young Asian and Pacific Islander leaders in building skills around violence prevention, healthy relationships, and community organizing. She also serves on the steering committee of Vigilant Love, a Muslim and Japanese-American arts and activism organization dedicated to fighting Islamophobia and building solidarity. Her thesis at Oxy explored the relationship between Asian American and South Asian political consciousness and conceptualizations of solidarity with Black American communities.
 
Nathan Tam ‘23 (he/him) is UEP major from San Francisco interested in untold stories, learning family histories, and building community solidarity and support at an individual and at a collective level. His research focuses on the history and place-making of Chinese America and the factors that facilitate or detract (or potentially a combo of both) from the social bonding of “community”. His current thesis research builds upon this in discovering sites of community in urban Chinatowns throughout Chinese American history and illuminating younger Asian Americans’ relationship to traditional and unconventional sites of community building in the development of their racial identity. 

Image Credit: Oxy Weekly/Julia Koh

Tags: Arts